A Marti Report Is a Birth Certificate for Your Ford Muscle Car – Hot Rod Network

When it comes to documenting muscle cars, Ford guys have it good. Not only does every VIN tag identify the original engine that was installed in the vehicle, but a vast wealth of information is available from Ford’s own computer database, which is now exclusively licensed to Marti Auto Works. While a Marti Report is familiar to many Ford fans, even some Dearborn faithful may be foggy as to the genesis of the data, as well as some of the findings through the years.

In a nutshell, a Marti Report identifies a multitude of specifics about an individual car and is available for all FoMoCo products from 1967-2012. The Deluxe Report is the midrange of the three available levels of documentation, and the most popular. (A Standard report costs $18, Deluxe $46, and Elite $275.) The Deluxe Report identifies such things as a complete list of options, scheduled and actual build dates, selling dealership, and how many similar cars were built. The information is not only a gold mine for current owners but also a fantastic resource for potential buyers. The latter may find the Standard Report adequate for their needs. It includes a complete list of original options, colors, and drivetrain specifics. The Standard Report is sent as a PDF file in 7-10 days, and rush/same-day service is also available.

Far beyond the individual stats that the Ford/Marti database can provide is the potential to research information more broadly applicable to the hobby. Ever wonder how many 1971 Mustang convertibles were built with the 429 Super Cobra Jet and four-speed? The answer is five. Care to know the breakdown between 3.91- and 4.11-geared cars among them? Marti can do that as well. In short, the Marti data has transformed the Ford collector car scene with an incredible amount of factory documentation and accurate production numbers, enabling buyers to purchase with confidence and dispelling years of false information, myths, and rumor.

Marti Auto Works’ owner and driving force, Kevin Marti, is actually a Mercury Cougar fan. “When I was 16, I was looking for my first car and was primarily interested in a Chevelle or Camaro,” he says. “While looking through newspaper ads I stumbled across a listing for a 1967 Cougar. I went and looked at it, fell for it, and the rest is history. I still own that same Cougar today.”

It’s from Kevin’s enthusiast core that Marti Auto Works initially sprang, offering concours-quality wear items such as radiator hoses, fan belts, and sparkplug wires, which remain a big part of the business today. As a participant in the hobby, Kevin developed a curiosity for understanding the rarity of FoMoCo products. Through contacts he made over a period of 15 years, he came to realize there was a good chance that Ford computer data still existed from the 1960s. Eventually he connected with the right people at Ford, determined that the data was still there for cars built from 1967 on, and was able to exclusively license the database.

In an indirect way, Ralph Nader played a role in the existence of the Ford/Marti database. Nader’s famous auto safety campaigns led to the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966. Among other things, the act required manufacturers to retain detailed production data for the purpose of potential recalls. “This same sort of data was produced by Ford beginning in about 1957,” says Kevin, “but unfortunately it was erased each year prior to the 1966 Safety Act requiring it to be kept.”

Myths and Revelations

One of the great things that the Ford/Marti data has done is dispel a number of myths, some literally decades old. Chief among them? The 1967-1968 427 Mustang. In short, none were ever produced at any of the Ford assembly plants, despite reports of the contrary coming from various magazine articles, owner’s manual references, and the old-timer who swears that he saw an original 427 Mustang back in the day. The conjecture is understandable, as Ford frequently offered the same drivetrain options in its intermediates and ponycars. Fairlane had a 427 option in 1967, and the Cougar GT-E had a 427 in 1968, but it turns out that neither crossed over to the Mustang. The same holds true for 1968 Torinos. None were built with the 427, despite early FoMoCo sales brochures listing the 427 as an option.

Another myth revolved around 428 Cobra Jet Mustangs. A popular book reported production breakdowns of these cars that were later proven to be erroneous. The book identified 1970 as the year that the fewest number of 428 CJ Mustangs were built, followed by 1968 1/2 and then 1969. At the time it was a head scratcher, as 1968 1/2 CJ production lasted just four months while 1970 production spanned the model year. Nevertheless, the book numbers were picked up as gospel. It took the Marti data to reveal the legit numbers: The fewest CJ Mustangs were built as 1968 1/2 models; 1970 had about three times as many; 1969 was the most popular 428 CJ Mustang.

Closely related to the busted myths are the numerous revelations that have come to light. For instance, it has long been understood that while Ford offered the 427 as a production option in 1967 Fairlanes, the engine was strangely unavailable with the sporty GT package. Marti has uncovered that there was one legit exception, a 427 GT that appears to have been built for a Ford executive.

Another revelation: When the 428 CJ was introduced to ponycars and intermediates in the spring of 1968, an oddity occurred in which CJ Torinos and Cyclones were not available with a four-speed. You could get a four-speed in a CJ Mustang or Cougar, but not in an intermediate, with one Marti-documented exception. That’s right, a single 1968 428 CJ Torino was built with a four-speed transmission.

These “one-of-one” examples turn up somewhat regularly in Marti’s reports, due to the way production data is broken down and because of the myriad option combinations offered by all manufacturers, not just Ford, in the 1960s. But not all one-of-ones have the same significance. You can’t really compare the collectability of, say, a 1968 Mustang coupe that’s one-of-one because it’s yellow, has a bench seat, a 390, and a three-speed stick with the Fairlane and Torino mentioned above. The latter two are truly noteworthy, unusual, and desirable cars.

Outside the Box

There are other ways to use the Marti data, such as the reverse search. Jim Chism hoped he might someday find the original 1968 Ford XL GT that was given to him as a high school graduation present by his parents in 1968. He says, “I knew the dealer where it was sold and the equipment that was on it [including a Q-code 428]. Kevin was able to reverse-search it and come up with the original VIN. Now I’ll know for sure if I ever find it, even though I admit the chances are small. The Deluxe Marti Report I had done on it makes me feel like I have some small token of the car still with me.”

These examples scratch the surface as to what the Ford/Marti database has to offer. A Marti Report will continue to be enviable proof for buyers, sellers, and enthusiastic owners of Dearborn iron, while new discoveries are perhaps limited only by the man-hours necessary to uncover them. Already known are the VINs of numerous famous movie cars (Kevin was instrumental in documenting what turned out to be the long-lost 1968 Mustang from the movie Bullitt), a non–GT-E 1968 Cougar with a 427, the identities and unique equipment of prototype Torino Talladegas sold to private parties, and more. It all makes us grateful that Kevin fell for that Cougar all those years ago, rather than a Chevelle. If the latter had happened, it’s quite possible the Ford community would still be living without this godsend of detailed production data.

Kevin Marti’s database and paperwork were critical to proving Andrew Hack’s 1971 SportsRoof—an eBay find he was going to turn into a driver—as the lone known prototype for the stillborn 1971 Boss 302 program.Kevin Marti’s database and paperwork were critical to proving Andrew Hack’s 1971 SportsRoof—an eBay find he was going to turn into a driver—as the lone known prototype for the stillborn 1971 Boss 302 program.
Kevin Marti’s database and paperwork were critical to proving Andrew Hack’s 1971 SportsRoof—an eBay find he was going to turn into a driver—as the lone known prototype for the stillborn 1971 Boss 302 program.
This is part of the Marti Elite Report for Luis Chanes’ 1970 Mach 1 Twister Special. It spells out in detail virtually everything about the car as it was built and delivered. Just 96 Twister Special Mustangs were made as part of a Kansas City Ford dealer promotion, with 28 being 428 SCJ/four-speeds such as this.This is part of the Marti Elite Report for Luis Chanes’ 1970 Mach 1 Twister Special. It spells out in detail virtually everything about the car as it was built and delivered. Just 96 Twister Special Mustangs were made as part of a Kansas City Ford dealer promotion, with 28 being 428 SCJ/four-speeds such as this.
This is part of the Marti Elite Report for Luis Chanes’ 1970 Mach 1 Twister Special. It spells out in detail virtually everything about the car as it was built and delivered. Just 96 Twister Special Mustangs were made as part of a Kansas City Ford dealer promotion, with 28 being 428 SCJ/four-speeds such as this.
Another day at the office for Kevin Marti and his staff. In addition to the vast Ford computer database Marti Auto Works is known for, the company also stores tens of thousands of invoices and documents on microfiche and paper in a 2,000-square-foot warehouse.Another day at the office for Kevin Marti and his staff. In addition to the vast Ford computer database Marti Auto Works is known for, the company also stores tens of thousands of invoices and documents on microfiche and paper in a 2,000-square-foot warehouse.
Another day at the office for Kevin Marti and his staff. In addition to the vast Ford computer database Marti Auto Works is known for, the company also stores tens of thousands of invoices and documents on microfiche and paper in a 2,000-square-foot warehouse.
This is one of eight Mustang convertibles built in 1971 with a 429 Super Cobra Jet engine. While the VIN will verify a 429 CJ car, documentation from Marti will prove out specific details such as gear ratio (3.91s or 4.11s mean SCJ), transmission, color, trim options, and even if the car originally rolled on the Magnum 500s. This is one of eight Mustang convertibles built in 1971 with a 429 Super Cobra Jet engine. While the VIN will verify a 429 CJ car, documentation from Marti will prove out specific details such as gear ratio (3.91s or 4.11s mean SCJ), transmission, color, trim options, and even if the car originally rolled on the Magnum 500s.
This is one of eight Mustang convertibles built in 1971 with a 429 Super Cobra Jet engine. While the VIN will verify a 429 CJ car, documentation from Marti will prove out specific details such as gear ratio (3.91s or 4.11s mean SCJ), transmission, color, trim options, and even if the car originally rolled on the Magnum 500s.
Chris Osborne’s 1970 Cougar is a rare and original 428 CJ XR7 model. If he were to sell the car, a Marti Report would reveal several items that a buyer would want to know. One, Ram Air is original to the car, something the 1970 VIN doesn’t show. Also, the car was originally Black Jade with a black vinyl top. As the guy who changed it to Competition Yellow, Osborne would be up front with a potential buyer. But if the car were to change hands several times in the future, the color change info might be lost in the shuffle. The Marti report will tell it like it is.Chris Osborne’s 1970 Cougar is a rare and original 428 CJ XR7 model. If he were to sell the car, a Marti Report would reveal several items that a buyer would want to know. One, Ram Air is original to the car, something the 1970 VIN doesn’t show. Also, the car was originally Black Jade with a black vinyl top. As the guy who changed it to Competition Yellow, Osborne would be up front with a potential buyer. But if the car were to change hands several times in the future, the color change info might be lost in the shuffle. The Marti report will tell it like it is.
Chris Osborne’s 1970 Cougar is a rare and original 428 CJ XR7 model. If he were to sell the car, a Marti Report would reveal several items that a buyer would want to know. One, Ram Air is original to the car, something the 1970 VIN doesn’t show. Also, the car was originally Black Jade with a black vinyl top. As the guy who changed it to Competition Yellow, Osborne would be up front with a potential buyer. But if the car were to change hands several times in the future, the color change info might be lost in the shuffle. The Marti report will tell it like it is.
When Walt Golembiewski bought his 1970 Torino GT convertible in 1989, he knew it was one rare beast, but it wasn’t until the advent of the Marti Report in 1997 that he fully understood how rare. It turns out just 19 1970 Torino GT converts were built with a 429 Super Cobra Jet, and of those, 13 were four-speed cars like his. (We offer our condolences to the Golembiewski family, for as we put this story together, we learned of Walt’s passing.)When Walt Golembiewski bought his 1970 Torino GT convertible in 1989, he knew it was one rare beast, but it wasn’t until the advent of the Marti Report in 1997 that he fully understood how rare. It turns out just 19 1970 Torino GT converts were built with a 429 Super Cobra Jet, and of those, 13 were four-speed cars like his. (We offer our condolences to the Golembiewski family, for as we put this story together, we learned of Walt’s passing.)
When Walt Golembiewski bought his 1970 Torino GT convertible in 1989, he knew it was one rare beast, but it wasn’t until the advent of the Marti Report in 1997 that he fully understood how rare. It turns out just 19 1970 Torino GT converts were built with a 429 Super Cobra Jet, and of those, 13 were four-speed cars like his. (We offer our condolences to the Golembiewski family, for as we put this story together, we learned of Walt’s passing.)
Only four factory Pastel Yellow Boss 302s were built out of a total production run of 7,014 Boss 302s for 1970. This model year saw a marked change for Boss color availability, going from just four for 1969 to nearly the full Ford color palate for 1970. Mike Bickford is the proud owner of this rare Boss. His Marti Report proves its Code 9 Pastel Yellow provenance.Only four factory Pastel Yellow Boss 302s were built out of a total production run of 7,014 Boss 302s for 1970. This model year saw a marked change for Boss color availability, going from just four for 1969 to nearly the full Ford color palate for 1970. Mike Bickford is the proud owner of this rare Boss. His Marti Report proves its Code 9 Pastel Yellow provenance.
Only four factory Pastel Yellow Boss 302s were built out of a total production run of 7,014 Boss 302s for 1970. This model year saw a marked change for Boss color availability, going from just four for 1969 to nearly the full Ford color palate for 1970. Mike Bickford is the proud owner of this rare Boss. His Marti Report proves its Code 9 Pastel Yellow provenance.
Ford door tags changed from an aluminum tag to a sticker in 1970. Either way, door tags can prove much about a given Ford. But would you recognize the difference between an original and a reproduction that had been altered to reflect a transmission or color change? What if the tag had gone missing? These possibilities illustrate the relevance of a Marti Report beyond the information that can be deduced from the door tag.Ford door tags changed from an aluminum tag to a sticker in 1970. Either way, door tags can prove much about a given Ford. But would you recognize the difference between an original and a reproduction that had been altered to reflect a transmission or color change? What if the tag had gone missing? These possibilities illustrate the relevance of a Marti Report beyond the information that can be deduced from the door tag.
Ford door tags changed from an aluminum tag to a sticker in 1970. Either way, door tags can prove much about a given Ford. But would you recognize the difference between an original and a reproduction that had been altered to reflect a transmission or color change? What if the tag had gone missing? These possibilities illustrate the relevance of a Marti Report beyond the information that can be deduced from the door tag.

9 - XL GT photo.jpg

9 - XL GT photo.jpg

Jim Chism’s 1968 XL GT Fastback may be long gone, but he knows the VIN of the car thanks to a search of Marti’s database. The scrapbook photo shows the fullsize fastback as new, along with Chism and his cousins, Susan and Tommy Flowers.Jim Chism’s 1968 XL GT Fastback may be long gone, but he knows the VIN of the car thanks to a search of Marti’s database. The scrapbook photo shows the fullsize fastback as new, along with Chism and his cousins, Susan and Tommy Flowers.
Jim Chism’s 1968 XL GT Fastback may be long gone, but he knows the VIN of the car thanks to a search of Marti’s database. The scrapbook photo shows the fullsize fastback as new, along with Chism and his cousins, Susan and Tommy Flowers.
Kevin Marti’s database was particularly revealing for 428 Cobra Jet Mustang owners, as some erroneous production numbers had been widely circulated in previous years. Take Neil Biddlecombe’s 1968 1/2 Mustang coupe. We now know that just 221 coupes were equipped with the 428 CJ that year, making for a rarely seen beast.Kevin Marti’s database was particularly revealing for 428 Cobra Jet Mustang owners, as some erroneous production numbers had been widely circulated in previous years. Take Neil Biddlecombe’s 1968 1/2 Mustang coupe. We now know that just 221 coupes were equipped with the 428 CJ that year, making for a rarely seen beast.
Kevin Marti’s database was particularly revealing for 428 Cobra Jet Mustang owners, as some erroneous production numbers had been widely circulated in previous years. Take Neil Biddlecombe’s 1968 1/2 Mustang coupe. We now know that just 221 coupes were equipped with the 428 CJ that year, making for a rarely seen beast.

The post A Marti Report Is a Birth Certificate for Your Ford Muscle Car appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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How to Swap a Cop Car Frame Under an F-100 Pickup – Hot Rod Network

This is becoming a popular swap: putting 2003-and-newer Crown Victoria frames under older vehicles, especially pickups. There are several reasons for this. First, starting in 2003, the fullsized fords (Crown Victoria, Mercury Grand Marquis, and Lincoln Town Car) all had rack-and-pinion steering and a coilover-style spring and shock assembly. For several years, they even had cast-aluminum lower A-arms. The entire assembly bolts to the frame, so it’s that much easier to remove these components as a unit from a donor car and graft them onto an older vehicle, instantly giving it better suspension geometry, (relatively) big disc brakes, sealed-hub wheel bearings, and a modern, quick-ratio steering system. Second, the donor cars—Ford’s Panther Platform—are everywhere. We can’t go to a single junkyard in SoCal without tripping over about a dozen used police cars and taxis. Third, the components are tough. Designed for police work, the parts will take a beating. Fourth, replacement parts are cheap and can be found anywhere.

We weren’t the only members of the enthusiast media who heard of the Panther Platform swap. Hot Rod Garage stars Tony Angelo and Lucky Costa got the idea by talking with fans at the SEMA Show in Las Vegas. Doing some additional research, they discovered the wheelbase for a Crown Victoria and an early F-100 shortbed pickup are nearly identical, so they hatched the plan to swap the entire frame and drivetrain from a retired cop car to an F-100 they purchased locally. The result is a really cool shop truck that combines the awesome looks of an old car with the modern underpinnings of a new vehicle. It rides, corners, and stops like a Crown Vic, which is actually better than you may think. The last generation of these cars was far removed from the luxo-barges of the 1970s, and longtime Car Craft readers will remember we had our own Panther Platform project car: a 2003 Police Interceptor we bought at an auction and turned into a fun, reliable, and stealthy street machine.

Tony and Lucky performed the frame and body swap over the course of three episodes of Hot Rod Garage that are available on Motor Trend OnDemand. In the process, they decided on a name for the project: “The Crown Hick.” Watch the videos and read our ongoing coverage of this cool pickup.

Here are the two donor vehicles before any of the work began. The 2007 Crown police cruiser is from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department and it’s condition was typical of most retired Crown Victorias: dirty, scratched and dented, but mechanically sound. Hot Rod Garage hosts Tony Angelo and Lucky Costa found the F-100 locally on Craigslist, and it was in great shape for its age. It was a longbed, so the bed would have to be shortened to match the Crown Vic’s wheelbase. Here are the two donor vehicles before any of the work began. The 2007 Crown police cruiser is from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department and it’s condition was typical of most retired Crown Victorias: dirty, scratched and dented, but mechanically sound. Hot Rod Garage hosts Tony Angelo and Lucky Costa found the F-100 locally on Craigslist, and it was in great shape for its age. It was a longbed, so the bed would have to be shortened to match the Crown Vic’s wheelbase.
Here are the two donor vehicles before any of the work began. Cruiser Connections supplied the 2007 Crown Victoria. It came from the the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department and it’s condition was typical of most retired Crown Victorias: dirty, scratched and dented, but mechanically sound. Hot Rod Garage hosts Tony Angelo and Lucky Costa found the F-100 locally on Craigslist, and it was in great shape for its age. It was a longbed, so the bed would have to be shortened to match the Crown Vic’s wheelbase.
After some brief introductions on camera, Tony and Lucky got busy removing the bodies from the frames of both vehicles, starting with the pickup. After some brief introductions on camera, Tony and Lucky got busy removing the bodies from the frames of both vehicles, starting with the pickup.
After some brief introductions on camera, Tony and Lucky got busy removing the bodies from the frames of both vehicles, starting with the pickup.
They removed the F-100’s cab from the frame and rolled the rest away to deal with later.They removed the F-100’s cab from the frame and rolled the rest away to deal with later.
They removed the F-100’s cab from the frame and rolled the rest away to deal with later.
It didn’t take them long to remove the Crown Victoria’s body from it’s frame, either. The task basically involved removing the steering shaft, disconnecting the brake lines from the master cylinder, disconnecting the transmission shift cable, removing the body bolts, and removing the fuel filler neck at the gas tank. There were a couple stray wires and grounds that hung us up as they first attempted to lift the body. Once removed, they fully removed the body from the frame. It didn’t take them long to remove the Crown Victoria’s body from it’s frame, either. The task basically involved removing the steering shaft, disconnecting the brake lines from the master cylinder, disconnecting the transmission shift cable, removing the body bolts, and removing the fuel filler neck at the gas tank. There were a couple stray wires and grounds that hung us up as they first attempted to lift the body. Once removed, they fully removed the body from the frame.
It didn’t take them long to remove the Crown Victoria’s body from it’s frame, either. The task basically involved removing the steering shaft, disconnecting the brake lines from the master cylinder, disconnecting the transmission shift cable, removing the body bolts, and removing the fuel filler neck at the gas tank. There were a couple stray wires and grounds that hung us up as they first attempted to lift the body. Once removed, they fully removed the body from the frame.
Using a set of GoJacks, they rolled the Crown Victoria frame under the F-100 cab to see what parts of each interfered with the other. Using a set of GoJacks, they rolled the Crown Victoria frame under the F-100 cab to see what parts of each interfered with the other.
Using a set of GoJacks, they rolled the Crown Victoria frame under the F-100 cab to see what parts of each interfered with the other.
As a gag for their social-media followers, Tony and Lucky set the F-100’s front clip in front of the Crown Vic, saying that was the swap they were doing with these two cars. As a gag for their social-media followers, Tony and Lucky set the F-100’s front clip in front of the Crown Vic, saying that was the swap they were doing with these two cars.
As a gag for their social-media followers, Tony and Lucky set the F-100’s front clip in front of the Crown Vic, saying that was the swap they were doing with these two cars.

2007-ford-crown-victoria-frame-swap-1966-ford-f-100-8

2007-ford-crown-victoria-frame-swap-1966-ford-f-100-8

Tony and Lucky next began fitting the F-100 to the police car frame, having to trim away sections of the inner fenders and remove about 3 inches of the front of the frame that actually extended past the front of the F-100’s body. Tony and Lucky next began fitting the F-100 to the police car frame, having to trim away sections of the inner fenders and remove about 3 inches of the front of the frame that actually extended past the front of the F-100’s body.
Tony and Lucky next began fitting the F-100 to the police car frame, having to trim away sections of the inner fenders and remove about 3 inches of the front of the frame that actually extended past the front of the F-100’s body.

2007-ford-crown-victoria-frame-swap-1966-ford-f-100-8

2007-ford-crown-victoria-frame-swap-1966-ford-f-100-8

They also had to trim some of the floor braces and a section of the rear of the cab floor, because the Crown Victoria frame is wider here than the F-100’s frame was. Lucky is tracing a patch panel on a piece of 18-gauge steel.They also had to trim some of the floor braces and a section of the rear of the cab floor, because the Crown Victoria frame is wider here than the F-100’s frame was. Lucky is tracing a patch panel on a piece of 18-gauge steel.
They also had to trim some of the floor braces and a section of the rear of the cab floor, because the Crown Victoria frame is wider here than the F-100’s frame was. Lucky is tracing a patch panel on a piece of 18-gauge steel.
To begin the process of making body mounts, Tony dropped a plum bob from the F-100’s floor to a suitable location on the police car frame. To begin the process of making body mounts, Tony dropped a plum bob from the F-100’s floor to a suitable location on the police car frame.
To begin the process of making body mounts, Tony dropped a plum bob from the F-100’s floor to a suitable location on the police car frame.
They used pieces of Delrin bushings from an off-road truck body-lift kit for the body mounts in this project, cutting and trimming them as needed. Here, they attached a bushing to the F-100’s mount location, lowered the body to the frame, and traced the outline of the steel plate on the police car frame. They used pieces of Delrin bushings from an off-road truck body-lift kit for the body mounts in this project, cutting and trimming them as needed. Here, they attached a bushing to the F-100’s mount location, lowered the body to the frame, and traced the outline of the steel plate on the police car frame.
They used pieces of Delrin bushings from an off-road truck body-lift kit for the body mounts in this project, cutting and trimming them as needed. Here, they attached a bushing to the F-100’s mount location, lowered the body to the frame, and traced the outline of the steel plate on the police car frame.
They then welded the steel plates to the Crown Victoria’s frame and gave them a coat of paint to protect against corrosion.They then welded the steel plates to the Crown Victoria’s frame and gave them a coat of paint to protect against corrosion.
They then welded the steel plates to the Crown Victoria’s frame and gave them a coat of paint to protect against corrosion.
At the front, they welded a mount to the end of the frame to serve as the front mount under the core support. At the front, they welded a mount to the end of the frame to serve as the front mount under the core support.
At the front, they welded a mount to the end of the frame to serve as the front mount under the core support.

16_Crown_Vic_Frame_Swap.JPG

16_Crown_Vic_Frame_Swap.JPG

To support the back of the cab, Tony and Lucky made a crossmember out of square tubing, miter-cut to rise up from the frame to reach the floor of the cab with enough room for another Delrin body mount. Note the block of wood supporting the cab while mocking it up. Lucky did the final fitting and welding. To support the back of the cab, Tony and Lucky made a crossmember out of square tubing, miter-cut to rise up from the frame to reach the floor of the cab with enough room for another Delrin body mount. Note the block of wood supporting the cab while mocking it up. Lucky did the final fitting and welding.
To support the back of the cab, Tony and Lucky made a crossmember out of square tubing, miter-cut to rise up from the frame to reach the floor of the cab with enough room for another Delrin body mount. Note the block of wood supporting the cab while mocking it up. Lucky did the final fitting and welding.

18_Crown_Vic_Frame_Swap.JPG

18_Crown_Vic_Frame_Swap.JPG

Being performance enthusiasts like us, Tony and Lucky decided to add some performance parts to the Crown Victoria before putting the F-100 body on it. First up was a Stainless Works exhaust system, designed to fit 2003-and-later Panther Platform cars. We used a Stainless Works kit on our Project Panther several years ago and can attest the fit and finish is excellent. The HRG guys got the same kit we did, minus the tailpipes. Being performance enthusiasts like us, Tony and Lucky decided to add some performance parts to the Crown Victoria before putting the F-100 body on it. First up was a Stainless Works exhaust system, designed to fit 2003-and-later Panther Platform cars. We used a Stainless Works kit on our Project Panther several years ago and can attest the fit and finish is excellent. The HRG guys got the same kit we did, minus the tailpipes.
Being performance enthusiasts like us, Tony and Lucky decided to add some performance parts to the Crown Victoria before putting the F-100 body on it. First up was a Stainless Works exhaust system, designed to fit 2003-and-later Panther Platform cars. We used a Stainless Works kit on our Project Panther several years ago and can attest the fit and finish is excellent. The HRG guys got the same kit we did, minus the tailpipes.

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20_Crown_Vic_Frame_Swap.JPG

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2007-ford-crown-victoria-frame-swap-1966-ford-f-100-20

Panther Platform specialist Chris Adams at ADTR.net supplied front and rear sway bars, Heinous Motorsports upper and lower trailing arms, and a set of Metco Motorsports Watt’s link arms. The Heinous trailing arms are CNC-machined billet aluminum and come loaded with Energy Suspension graphite-impregnated polyurethane bushings. The Watt’s link arms are also CNC-machined aluminum and come with Energy Suspension Hyperflex bushings. Either way, both offer stiffer bushings than stock and are much stronger than the stock stamped arms. Chris also recommends replacing the stud on the axlehousing that holds the Watt’s link bellcrank with an ARP stud he sells. He’s seen a few stock ones break in unmodified vehicles with high mileage. Because the Watt’s link is the only thing that centers the axle within the frame, things get ugly if this part breaks. Panther Platform specialist Chris Adams at ADTR.net supplied front and rear sway bars, Heinous Motorsports upper and lower trailing arms, and a set of Metco Motorsports Watt’s link arms. The Heinous trailing arms are CNC-machined billet aluminum and come loaded with Energy Suspension graphite-impregnated polyurethane bushings. The Watt’s link arms are also CNC-machined aluminum and come with Energy Suspension Hyperflex bushings. Either way, both offer stiffer bushings than stock and are much stronger than the stock stamped arms. Chris also recommends replacing the stud on the axlehousing that holds the Watt’s link bellcrank with an ARP stud he sells. He’s seen a few stock ones break in unmodified vehicles with high mileage. Because the Watt’s link is the only thing that centers the axle within the frame, things get ugly if this part breaks.
Panther Platform specialist Chris Adams at ADTR.net supplied front and rear sway bars, Heinous Motorsports upper and lower trailing arms, and a set of Metco Motorsports Watt’s link arms. The Heinous trailing arms are CNC-machined billet aluminum and come loaded with Energy Suspension graphite-impregnated polyurethane bushings. The Watt’s link arms are also CNC-machined aluminum and come with Energy Suspension Hyperflex bushings. Either way, both offer stiffer bushings than stock and are much stronger than the stock stamped arms. Chris also recommends replacing the stud on the axlehousing that holds the Watt’s link bellcrank with an ARP stud he sells. He’s seen a few stock ones break in unmodified vehicles with high mileage. Because the Watt’s link is the only thing that centers the axle within the frame, things get ugly if this part breaks.
Just to get the car running, Tony plucked the stock gas tank from the Crown Victoria and lashed it to the frame with a ratchet strap. In these cars, the gas tank sits vertically in the vehicle in a space between the back seat and the front of the trunk, so you can’t just put it on its side and expect the sender and pickup to work correctly. Don’t worry, the guys built a better fuel system with a modified Mustang gas tank you’ll read about in the next installment.Just to get the car running, Tony plucked the stock gas tank from the Crown Victoria and lashed it to the frame with a ratchet strap. In these cars, the gas tank sits vertically in the vehicle in a space between the back seat and the front of the trunk, so you can’t just put it on its side and expect the sender and pickup to work correctly. Don’t worry, the guys built a better fuel system with a modified Mustang gas tank you’ll read about in the next installment.
Just to get the car running, Tony plucked the stock gas tank from the Crown Victoria and lashed it to the frame with a ratchet strap. In these cars, the gas tank sits vertically in the vehicle in a space between the back seat and the front of the trunk, so you can’t just put it on its side and expect the sender and pickup to work correctly. Don’t worry, the guys built a better fuel system with a modified Mustang gas tank you’ll read about in the next installment.
Rather than pin-out the stock wiring harness and modify it to work in this application, the guys decided to use Holley’s Terminator EFI for Modular engines. It’s designed to work with cars 2004-and-older. In 2005, Ford switched to drive-by-wire throttle-bodies for its SOHC engines, and there were a few other wiring changes, including a different location for the coolant temperature sender and fuel injector connectors. Tony got a cable-driven throttle-body that connected with a cable kit from Lokar, and Lucky soldered the fuel injector connectors from the stock 2007 harness to Holley’s EFI harness. In the next installment, we’ll show you how they shortened the bed, mounted the gas tank, and got it running. Rather than pin-out the stock wiring harness and modify it to work in this application, the guys decided to use Holley’s Terminator EFI for Modular engines. It’s designed to work with cars 2004-and-older. In 2005, Ford switched to drive-by-wire throttle-bodies for its SOHC engines, and there were a few other wiring changes, including a different location for the coolant temperature sender and fuel injector connectors. Tony got a cable-driven throttle-body that connected with a cable kit from Lokar, and Lucky soldered the fuel injector connectors from the stock 2007 harness to Holley’s EFI harness. In the next installment, we’ll show you how they shortened the bed, mounted the gas tank, and got it running.
Rather than pin-out the stock wiring harness and modify it to work in this application, the guys decided to use Holley’s Terminator EFI for Modular engines. It’s designed to work with cars 2004-and-older. In 2005, Ford switched to drive-by-wire throttle-bodies for its SOHC engines, and there were a few other wiring changes, including a different location for the coolant temperature sender and fuel injector connectors. Tony got a cable-driven throttle-body that connected with a cable kit from Lokar, and Lucky soldered the fuel injector connectors from the stock 2007 harness to Holley’s EFI harness. In the next installment, we’ll show you how they shortened the bed, mounted the gas tank, and got it running.

The post How to Swap a Cop Car Frame Under an F-100 Pickup appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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EcoBoost vs. Dragstrip, Part II – Hot Rod Network

After running 14.30s with a stock 2016 Mustang EcoBoost, the results were predictable. The internet told us about how we should have bought a V8 instead of the wimp car or that their motor-swapped Honda on slicks was quicker and faster. Most of these comparisons were with cars that had been modified, so we decided we need a tune.

002_Ecoboost_Mustang_tuned_dyno_side.JPG

002_Ecoboost_Mustang_tuned_dyno_side.JPG

A handheld tuner rewrites some of the programming in your engine’s software, adjusting boost, fueling, timing, and even cam timing with just a few table changes. While running low-14s in a 3,475-pound (without driver) four-banger is pretty good, there’s still a lot left on the table. Engineers try as hard as they can to make new cars idiot-proof, which means they’re tuned for any octane at any elevation under any temperature. We were around sea level and looking for some fast dragstrip times, so we felt a change in calibration would definitely help. Enter SCT’s X4 Performance Programmer.

One of the biggest names in the aftermarket tuning industry, SCT offers a X4 handheld tuner that works on everything from diesel pickups to newer muscle cars, including our own turbo four-cylinder. We got ours from No Limit Fabrication, which always has SCTs in stock and even has a 2.7L F-150 EcoBoost of its own to play with.

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008_Ecoboost_Mustang_tuned_dragstrip.JPG

When we first plugged in the SCT to our Mustang, it was in need of an update. While it’s possible to update the SCT through a wi-fi network, it’s easier to download and install SCT’s Device Updater software at SCTflash.com. After following the instructions, we were plugged in our SCT handheld into a basic laptop (with the provided cables) and quickly updated it. After the latest revision was loaded, it was time to plug it into our Mustang.

007_Ecoboost_Mustang_tuned_dyno_front_no_fans.JPG

007_Ecoboost_Mustang_tuned_dyno_front_no_fans.JPG

Since the SCT X4 will be downloading a huge amount of stock computer files from the ECM, it’s important to carefully follow the instructions and turn all the accessories off (auto headlights, stereo, and so on) before attempting the procedure. There are options for octane (87, 91, or 93), removing the speed limiter (we chose yes), and rev-limit options (which we set at 6,800 rpm). The SCT’s screen will prompt you to turn the key on and off a couple times right before the program is loaded, but other than that, you pretty much sit and wait—it took about 10 minutes to download the factory files and upload a tune.

SCT’s 91-Octane Tune: Tested

Since 93-octane gasoline isn’t available everywhere, we did our initial test on 91 octane, which isn’t known for performing that well, especially with turbo cars. With our little Mustang making 18 pounds of boost by 3,000 rpm, we wondered how much room there was for timing and other fiddling with the 91 fuel. Thanks to some time constraints, we were only able to make a couple eighth-mile runs, but the results were encouraging. Before, our best times hovered in the 9.20 to 9.30 range at about 76 to 78 mph, but with the 91 tune, our best passes were in the 9.20s at 80 mph! A softer 60-foot time (2.24 versus 2.17) was why the e.t. wasn’t quicker, but with an extra 2 mph in the eighth, it was definitely making more power. In fact, the results were good enough that we decided to go straight to the 93-octane tune.

SCT’s 93-Octane Tune: Tested at Redding Dragstrip and on the Dyno at Boosted Tuning

Our buddy Steve “Driver Mod” Ellis at Speed Garage had a can of Torco’s Unleaded Accelerator on the shelf, an additive designed to boost the octane of normal unleaded fuel up to a maximum of 105 octane. For those with newer cars, it’s also safe for oxygen sensors, unlike leaded fuel. We mixed one can with a full tank and headed to the dragstrip to see what type of times we could find. We also brought a helmet just in case, as 13.99 seemed like it was going to happen on 93 octane. Our first pass resulted in a marginal launch and marginal shifting, but was still a 14.08 at 99 mph, nearly three-tenths better than our previous best. Steve wanted to try driving the Mustang, so we tossed him the keys and said he’d better run 13s. Unbeknownst to us, he’d also lowered the tire pressure from the factory 35-psi setting to 22 psi in search of better traction. On the launch, he modulated the throttle like you would on a turbo drag bike at about 3,000 to 3,500 rpm, which resulted in a best-ever 60-foot time of 2.00 seconds and a pass of 13.65 at 101.6 mph. Overall, we’d picked up more than half a second and nearly 4 mph with tuning and tire pressure. Better yet, we were only about six-tenths away from the 12-second zone.

While we had our 93 tune loaded, we wanted to see what the SCT was actually giving us power-wise. On the factory tuning, rolling into the throttle at 2,000 rpm spooled up full boost and the car was making nearly 280 lb-ft of torque by just 2,500 rpm. Horsepower peaked at 278 at 5,500 rpm and started dropping off rapidly—down to 221 hp at 6,500 rpm. With SCT’s 93-octane tune, power jumped up immediately just like stock, but a lot more torque was produced between 3,000 and 4,500 rpm. After a mysterious dip at 5,000 rpm, the SCT tune kept trucking, making 295 hp at 5,500 rpm and cranking out the power through 6,500 rpm, where it still checked in at 256 hp.

ID Motorsport’s 116 Tune: On the Dyno and at Sacramento Raceway

Detonation is a killer in engines (new or old), and at 22 psi, we could only run so much timing. Or could we? We consulted with EcoBoost specialist ID Motorsports and asked for a race-gas tune that was still safe. We also talked to Fuse Fuels, makers of 116-octane unleaded that’s safe for oxygen sensors, yet still detonation-resistant. Fuse programmed a timing curve to work with its 116-octane gasoline.

It was a 40-degree night on Sacramento Raceway’s last street-car race of the year and knew track conditions would be less than perfect. As soon as we launched the car, we were grateful for our new neutral rev limiter. It allows us to set the launch rpm at any engine speed—in this case, 3,000 rpm. Staging was now much easier and boost was right on tap. After a bit of wheel spin and pedaling through First gear, the car was much stronger on the big end, running 13.73 at 104.89 mph on our first pass. After six more passes, we ran a best of 13.41 at 106.6 mph, a 5-mph increase over the 93-octane tune. Even with more power, our 60-foot time couldn’t match previous runs, as a 2.04 was the best we could pull off on the cold surface. We’d seen some similarly modified cars on the internet running 12.70s at 106 mph, so we knew our power was on point—the weather conditions weren’t.

After our dragstrip outing, we hit the chassis dyno absolutely positive we were going to break 300 hp at the wheels. With the Mustang strapped down at Boosted Tuning, we spun the rollers to an impressive 326 hp and a staggering 411 lb-ft of torque at the wheels. Although the monster torque at 3,300 rpm didn’t last long (our guess was it was a spike before the wastegate opened), the engine made more than 300 lb-ft of torque from 3,000 to 5,500 rpm. Peak power was up 48 hp from stock and torque jumped a whopping 129 lb-ft. Checking the X4’s gauge/datalog we noted the big power jump was probably thanks to an additional 4 to 8 degrees of timing advance (stock is close to 0 degrees under boost), depending on the rpm. Boost remained at the same 22 psi as the 93-octane tune, since the little turbocharger was already close to its limit.

The Verdict

After testing the SCT programmer on the dyno and at the track, we can say it’s a neat upgrade. It makes the Mustang more powerful, more driveable, and more fun, with extra power and torque from 3,000 rpm all the way to its 6,800-rpm redline. For $399, it’s quite the budget add-on, and with a $150 custom tune and a little race gas, it was incredibly potent and enough to give us a 2-1 track record against factory 5.0 Mustangs (so far). Do we still wish we had a V8? After our last 33-mpg trip to Las Vegas, not so far!

The post EcoBoost vs. Dragstrip, Part II appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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NextGen Performance Gives Factory-Recall LSA Blowers New Life on 4.8, 5.3, and 6.0 Gen IIIs. Here’s How. – Hot Rod Network

Brothers Josh and Eric Buzzell of NextGen Performance have found a way to bring low-buck, supercharged performance to junkyard-sourced 5.3-, 5.7-, and 6.0L LS2 and LS3 truck engines, which they then swap into cars of every description. It all started with the 2014 GM factory service bulletin affecting more than 10,000 2009–2013 CTS-V Cadillacs and 9,900-plus 2012–2013 ZL1 Camaros. It seems their Eaton-sourced superchargers started making odd noises at idle after a few seasons of use. Owners of these potent 6.2L, 556hp (580 in Camaro), LSA-equipped factory hot rods complained of “loose marble” rattling sounds at engine speeds below 1,200 rpm. Function and performance were not affected, but GM had to react under the increasing public scrutiny. After all, these cars weren’t cheap to buy, and rattling sounds at idle were unwelcomed by owners of these sinister brawlers.

The result was a nationwide warranty-repair campaign (as described in GM Service Bulletin No. 13313) launched in May 2014. Because GM didn’t want to risk having service technicians disassemble the faulty blowers and affect spot repairs, they simply yanked the entire supercharger unit and replaced it with a fresh (and upgraded) assembly. As for the take-off units, some got smashed by sledgehammers and others wound up on eBay.

With more than 20,000 LSA engines affected by the repair campaign, a large chunk of loud-but-functional, take-off superchargers suddenly showed up online for less than a grand. This is where the Buzzell brothers and NextGen Performance entered the picture. They figured, why not find a way to adapt these surplus blowers for use on dime-a-dozen pickup truck and SUV LS2 and LS3 junkyard engines? Thanks to the heavy use of corrosive road salt in the Northeast, their local boneyards were crawling with Gen III V8-powered Chevy and GMC pickups and SUVs. Though their rusted frames and bodies forced scrapping, their potent LS engines were still going strong.

Seeing an opportunity, NextGen engineered a nifty little “1 + 1 = 3” kit that combines orphaned LSA blowers and serviceable boneyard 5.3, 5.7, and 6.2 V8s. Here’s a look at how NextGen conjured a way to adopt the cast-off LSA blowers to these used Gen III V8s. Everything shown here is available in a handy kit from NextGen. Get started today!

Typical GM warranty-repair, take-off LSA blowers (“rattlers”) bought from online sellers look like this when you open the box. They lack the intercooler, lid, injectors, and fuel rails since the GM warranty program calls for the reuse of those unaffected items on the host vehicle. We’ll show you where to get the missing goods.Typical GM warranty-repair, take-off LSA blowers (“rattlers”) bought from online sellers look like this when you open the box. They lack the intercooler, lid, injectors, and fuel rails since the GM warranty program calls for the reuse of those unaffected items on the host vehicle. We’ll show you where to get the missing goods.
Typical GM warranty-repair, take-off LSA blowers (“rattlers”) bought from online sellers look like this when you open the box. They lack the intercooler, lid, injectors, and fuel rails since the GM warranty program calls for the reuse of those unaffected items on the host vehicle. We’ll show you where to get the missing goods.
The blurred line on the worn LSA supercharger drive pulley is the result of torsional isolator failure. When failed, toggling the pulley back and forth delivers an 1/8 inch of lash, which is the source of the “marble” sound at idle. On a new or repaired blower, lash is negligible.The blurred line on the worn LSA supercharger drive pulley is the result of torsional isolator failure. When failed, toggling the pulley back and forth delivers an 1/8 inch of lash, which is the source of the “marble” sound at idle. On a new or repaired blower, lash is negligible.
The blurred line on the worn LSA supercharger drive pulley is the result of torsional isolator failure. When failed, toggling the pulley back and forth delivers an 1/8 inch of lash, which is the source of the “marble” sound at idle. On a new or repaired blower, lash is negligible.
Repairing the damaged isolator begins with removing the throttle-body inlet snout and blower drive pulley housing. The trio of steel drive pins engages the torsional isolator.Repairing the damaged isolator begins with removing the throttle-body inlet snout and blower drive pulley housing. The trio of steel drive pins engages the torsional isolator.
Repairing the damaged isolator begins with removing the throttle-body inlet snout and blower drive pulley housing. The trio of steel drive pins engages the torsional isolator.
Inside the supercharger case, the torsional isolator is visible. Notice the absence of traditional paper gaskets. All mating surfaces rely on RTV.Inside the supercharger case, the torsional isolator is visible. Notice the absence of traditional paper gaskets. All mating surfaces rely on RTV.
Inside the supercharger case, the torsional isolator is visible. Notice the absence of traditional paper gaskets. All mating surfaces rely on RTV.
It’s not necessary to extract the rotors from the rear of the case, but we’ve done it here for clarity. The offending torsional isolator is held in Eric Buzzell’s hand. When new, the rotors exhibit a dark-gray, anti-scuff texture. The consistent-width bands of wear seen here are normal and no cause for concern. Buzzell warns, “Never use anything more abrasive than your fingers when cleaning the rotors and don’t use anything else than AC Delco Supercharger Oil, PN 10-4041” (5.1 ounces does the job).It’s not necessary to extract the rotors from the rear of the case, but we’ve done it here for clarity. The offending torsional isolator is held in Eric Buzzell’s hand. When new, the rotors exhibit a dark-gray, anti-scuff texture. The consistent-width bands of wear seen here are normal and no cause for concern. Buzzell warns, “Never use anything more abrasive than your fingers when cleaning the rotors and don’t use anything else than AC Delco Supercharger Oil, PN 10-4041” (5.1 ounces does the job).
It’s not necessary to extract the rotors from the rear of the case, but we’ve done it here for clarity. The offending torsional isolator is held in Eric Buzzell’s hand. When new, the rotors exhibit a dark-gray, anti-scuff texture. The consistent-width bands of wear seen here are normal and no cause for concern. Buzzell warns, “Never use anything more abrasive than your fingers when cleaning the rotors and don’t use anything else than AC Delco Supercharger Oil, PN 10-4041” (5.1 ounces does the job).
The coiled spring inside the plastic body of the torsional wear isolator is harder than the driveshaft its wrapped around. After failure, the spring misaligns and begins to wear into the shaft (notice the low spots). Does it run OK? Sure. Does it make clunking sounds at idle? Yes.The coiled spring inside the plastic body of the torsional wear isolator is harder than the driveshaft its wrapped around. After failure, the spring misaligns and begins to wear into the shaft (notice the low spots). Does it run OK? Sure. Does it make clunking sounds at idle? Yes.
The coiled spring inside the plastic body of the torsional wear isolator is harder than the driveshaft its wrapped around. After failure, the spring misaligns and begins to wear into the shaft (notice the low spots). Does it run OK? Sure. Does it make clunking sounds at idle? Yes.
The pointer highlights where the end of the spring wears through a wall within the plastic isolator. Once this happens, the spring is no longer preloaded or concentric with the shaft. The results are the rattling sound and odd driveshaft wear patterns (seen earlier).The pointer highlights where the end of the spring wears through a wall within the plastic isolator. Once this happens, the spring is no longer preloaded or concentric with the shaft. The results are the rattling sound and odd driveshaft wear patterns (seen earlier).
The pointer highlights where the end of the spring wears through a wall within the plastic isolator. Once this happens, the spring is no longer preloaded or concentric with the shaft. The results are the rattling sound and odd driveshaft wear patterns (seen earlier).
GM and the aftermarket have come up with numerous remedies for the problem. At the top is the stock parts layout, below (left to right) are the stock isolator (failed, note misaligned spring), solid aftermarket replacement and Eaton replacement. Each is effective at taming the offensive noise. Pick your favorite. Once installed, the noise is eliminated and reassembly can begin.GM and the aftermarket have come up with numerous remedies for the problem. At the top is the stock parts layout, below (left to right) are the stock isolator (failed, note misaligned spring), solid aftermarket replacement and Eaton replacement. Each is effective at taming the offensive noise. Pick your favorite. Once installed, the noise is eliminated and reassembly can begin.
GM and the aftermarket have come up with numerous remedies for the problem. At the top is the stock parts layout, below (left to right) are the stock isolator (failed, note misaligned spring), solid aftermarket replacement and Eaton replacement. Each is effective at taming the offensive noise. Pick your favorite. Once installed, the noise is eliminated and reassembly can begin.
There are two (stock) intercooler solutions. The black powdercoated, ribbed Chevrolet Performance Camaro ZL1 unit (right, PN 12622236) and Cadillac CTS-V units interchange, but the Camaro item is 3/4 inch taller. The Camaro intercooler plumbing feeds at the front of the engine and requires specific OE click-fit couplers. The Caddy plumbing faces the firewall and accepts traditional rubber hoses and clamps for easier installation. Both run about $550 new, but can often be found for less as take-off items from LSA hot rodders.There are two (stock) intercooler solutions. The black powdercoated, ribbed Chevrolet Performance Camaro ZL1 unit (right, PN 12622236) and Cadillac CTS-V units interchange, but the Camaro item is 3/4 inch taller. The Camaro intercooler plumbing feeds at the front of the engine and requires specific OE click-fit couplers. The Caddy plumbing faces the firewall and accepts traditional rubber hoses and clamps for easier installation. Both run about $550 new, but can often be found for less as take-off items from LSA hot rodders.
There are two (stock) intercooler solutions. The black powdercoated, ribbed Chevrolet Performance Camaro ZL1 unit (right, PN 12622236) and Cadillac CTS-V units interchange, but the Camaro item is 3/4 inch taller. The Camaro intercooler plumbing feeds at the front of the engine and requires specific OE click-fit couplers. The Caddy plumbing faces the firewall and accepts traditional rubber hoses and clamps for easier installation. Both run about $550 new, but can often be found for less as take-off items from LSA hot rodders.
Both intercooler units are interchangeable, but the taller Camaro intercooler (foreground) has more plenum volume and uses a slightly larger core. This may account for the 24hp higher claim (580 versus 556). Note the Cadillac’s firewall-facing, fluid-entry/exit location, and conventional hose barbs. The internet is packed with Caddy CTS-V take-off units from folks who swapped up to ZL1 Camaro equipment. Note to horsepower heroes: Both of these OE intercoolers are known to crush under extreme boost levels. But at the stock 9-psi setting, they’re fine.Both intercooler units are interchangeable, but the taller Camaro intercooler (foreground) has more plenum volume and uses a slightly larger core. This may account for the 24hp higher claim (580 versus 556). Note the Cadillac’s firewall-facing, fluid-entry/exit location, and conventional hose barbs. The internet is packed with Caddy CTS-V take-off units from folks who swapped up to ZL1 Camaro equipment. Note to horsepower heroes: Both of these OE intercoolers are known to crush under extreme boost levels. But at the stock 9-psi setting, they’re fine.
Both intercooler units are interchangeable, but the taller Camaro intercooler (foreground) has more plenum volume and uses a slightly larger core. This may account for the 24hp higher claim (580 versus 556). Note the Cadillac’s firewall-facing, fluid-entry/exit location, and conventional hose barbs. The internet is packed with Caddy CTS-V take-off units from folks who swapped up to ZL1 Camaro equipment. Note to horsepower heroes: Both of these OE intercoolers are known to crush under extreme boost levels. But at the stock 9-psi setting, they’re fine.
Eric points out the cathedral-type, intake-port window used on LS1, LS2, and many LS3 engines. The LSA intake manifold uses the rectangular port common to most Gen IV engines. What to do?Eric points out the cathedral-type, intake-port window used on LS1, LS2, and many LS3 engines. The LSA intake manifold uses the rectangular port common to most Gen IV engines. What to do?
Eric points out the cathedral-type, intake-port window used on LS1, LS2, and many LS3 engines. The LSA intake manifold uses the rectangular port common to most Gen IV engines. What to do?
Fortunately, I.C.T. Billet offers the perfect solution in its machined-billet adapter plates. Complete with integral silicone sealing rings, these 1/2-inch-thick plates require longer intake-manifold fasteners. Here, one has already been bolted to the cylinder head.Fortunately, I.C.T. Billet offers the perfect solution in its machined-billet adapter plates. Complete with integral silicone sealing rings, these 1/2-inch-thick plates require longer intake-manifold fasteners. Here, one has already been bolted to the cylinder head.
Fortunately, I.C.T. Billet offers the perfect solution in its machined-billet adapter plates. Complete with integral silicone sealing rings, these 1/2-inch-thick plates require longer intake-manifold fasteners. Here, one has already been bolted to the cylinder head.
With a replacement torsional isolator fitted and the LSA blower/intercooler reassembled, installation on most LS2 and LS3 engines is stymied by the alternator. Clunk! Here, the throttle-body mount and alternator are fighting for the same space. This non-powdercoated, smooth-top LSA blower is from a Cadillac donor vehicle.With a replacement torsional isolator fitted and the LSA blower/intercooler reassembled, installation on most LS2 and LS3 engines is stymied by the alternator. Clunk! Here, the throttle-body mount and alternator are fighting for the same space. This non-powdercoated, smooth-top LSA blower is from a Cadillac donor vehicle.
With a replacement torsional isolator fitted and the LSA blower/intercooler reassembled, installation on most LS2 and LS3 engines is stymied by the alternator. Clunk! Here, the throttle-body mount and alternator are fighting for the same space. This non-powdercoated, smooth-top LSA blower is from a Cadillac donor vehicle.
To allow progress, the offending alternator mount is sliced away as shown. The idler pulley unscrews and will be reused. NextGen Performance offers modified alternator adapters on an exchange basis. Truck-sourced LS engines come with the deepest crank pulleys. The NextGen’s LSA blower adapter kit is designed to work on these donor engines.To allow progress, the offending alternator mount is sliced away as shown. The idler pulley unscrews and will be reused. NextGen Performance offers modified alternator adapters on an exchange basis. Truck-sourced LS engines come with the deepest crank pulleys. The NextGen’s LSA blower adapter kit is designed to work on these donor engines.
To allow progress, the offending alternator mount is sliced away as shown. The idler pulley unscrews and will be reused. NextGen Performance offers modified alternator adapters on an exchange basis. Truck-sourced LS engines come with the deepest crank pulleys. The NextGen’s LSA blower adapter kit is designed to work on these donor engines.
NextGen designed this 1/4-inch-thick steel adapter plate that’s pre-drilled and tapped. Manufactured by NextGen machinist Jeremy Farrow, production items will be powdercoated.NextGen designed this 1/4-inch-thick steel adapter plate that’s pre-drilled and tapped. Manufactured by NextGen machinist Jeremy Farrow, production items will be powdercoated.
NextGen designed this 1/4-inch-thick steel adapter plate that’s pre-drilled and tapped. Manufactured by NextGen machinist Jeremy Farrow, production items will be powdercoated.
The idler pulley is transferred to a pre-tapped hole on the NextGen adapter plate.The idler pulley is transferred to a pre-tapped hole on the NextGen adapter plate.
The idler pulley is transferred to a pre-tapped hole on the NextGen adapter plate.
On the passenger side, the stock belt tensioner is retained (left) but with a NextGen dual idler pulley plate placed beneath it. NextGen uses OE-type, 54mm, high-speed pulleys with fully welded spacers to eliminate flex.On the passenger side, the stock belt tensioner is retained (left) but with a NextGen dual idler pulley plate placed beneath it. NextGen uses OE-type, 54mm, high-speed pulleys with fully welded spacers to eliminate flex.
On the passenger side, the stock belt tensioner is retained (left) but with a NextGen dual idler pulley plate placed beneath it. NextGen uses OE-type, 54mm, high-speed pulleys with fully welded spacers to eliminate flex.
With all of the reworked pulleys in place (thanks to the two adapter plates), this LS1 is ready to accept the refurbished LSA supercharger.With all of the reworked pulleys in place (thanks to the two adapter plates), this LS1 is ready to accept the refurbished LSA supercharger.
With all of the reworked pulleys in place (thanks to the two adapter plates), this LS1 is ready to accept the refurbished LSA supercharger.
The Buzzell brothers set the huffer in place. Note how the NextGen alternator relocation plate provides needed room for the throttle-body.The Buzzell brothers set the huffer in place. Note how the NextGen alternator relocation plate provides needed room for the throttle-body.
The Buzzell brothers set the huffer in place. Note how the NextGen alternator relocation plate provides needed room for the throttle-body.
All snugged down, the NAPA drivebelt (PN 060956) turns all of the factory-issued accessories, plus the LSA blower. On an otherwise stock 5.3L LM7 (the most common boneyard Gen III), an easy 400 hp results.All snugged down, the NAPA drivebelt (PN 060956) turns all of the factory-issued accessories, plus the LSA blower. On an otherwise stock 5.3L LM7 (the most common boneyard Gen III), an easy 400 hp results.
All snugged down, the NAPA drivebelt (PN 060956) turns all of the factory-issued accessories, plus the LSA blower. On an otherwise stock 5.3L LM7 (the most common boneyard Gen III), an easy 400 hp results.
Viewed from the passenger side, the NextGen adapters look factory. Be sure to tell Josh or Eric exactly which member of the LS engine family you’re working with for best results. Viewed from the passenger side, the NextGen adapters look factory. Be sure to tell Josh or Eric exactly which member of the LS engine family you’re working with for best results.
Viewed from the passenger side, the NextGen adapters look factory. Be sure to tell Josh or Eric exactly which member of the LS engine family you’re working with for best results.
The fuel rail can be obtained from several sources: this one’s a Caddy CTS-V unit (PN 12605222). The existing ECM on the host vehicle must be reprogrammed to work with the added supercharger. NextGen offers this service, as do hot rod shops across the nation. For best results, select a shop with a chassis dyno.The fuel rail can be obtained from several sources: this one’s a Caddy CTS-V unit (PN 12605222). The existing ECM on the host vehicle must be reprogrammed to work with the added supercharger. NextGen offers this service, as do hot rod shops across the nation. For best results, select a shop with a chassis dyno.
The fuel rail can be obtained from several sources: this one’s a Caddy CTS-V unit (PN 12605222). The existing ECM on the host vehicle must be reprogrammed to work with the added supercharger. NextGen offers this service, as do hot rod shops across the nation. For best results, select a shop with a chassis dyno.

The post NextGen Performance Gives Factory-Recall LSA Blowers New Life on 4.8, 5.3, and 6.0 Gen IIIs. Here’s How. appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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NHRA Pro Mod Kicks Off at Gatornationals + Stevie “Fast” Jackson Debut – Hot Rod Network

Swelling in popularity, NHRA’s Pro Mod class kicks off its 2017 season during this weekend’s 2017 Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals at Gainesville Raceway. BangShift‘s Brian Lohnes breaks down this year’s dominant drivers, and talks about the possibility of seeing every form of power-adder lined up at the upcoming Four-Wide Nationals.

One of the biggest stories to come out of this season is Stevie “Fast” Jackson’s move from radial racing to professional door-slammers in Pro Mod with a Jerry Bickel-built, blown Camaro. He’s been busy since that Wild airborne footage of his crash at at No Mercy 7 — Shadow has been reborn, and Stevie quickly reset the radial record at Lights Out 8 earlier this year. Stevie has come  up through the ranks of radial racing, and recently conquered the Bahrain Drag Racing World Championship and the Arabian Pro Series World Championship in the middle east. With a long-set goal of nitro racing, it will be interesting to watch his momentum in one of the most competitive classes in drag racing — and at the time of this writing, Stevie sits at the top of  day one qualifying.

The post NHRA Pro Mod Begins at Gatornationals + Stevie “Fast” Jackson Debut appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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GALLERY: Grand Prix of St. Petersburg – Hot Rod Network

We thought we’d give our followers here at circletrack.com something a little different heading into the weekend. Even though there were some right turns involved, we got some awesome shots from last weekend’s Grand Prix of St. Petersburg.

One of our trusted freelancers Jason Shultz decided to go check out the weekend’s events. As you can see, he found some really great places to shoot and got some awesome visuals. The weekend included the Verizon IndyCar Series, Mazda Road to Indy, Pirelli World Challenge Championships, and (maybe our favorite) the Speed Energy Stadium Super Trucks.

Sebastien Bourdais was the big winner on the weekend, and captured the win in fine fashion after starting dead last in the 21-car field. Alvaro Parente and Alec Udell split wins in the Pirelli World Championship. Former NASCAR racer Robby Gordon and Matt Brabham took wins in the Stadium Super Trucks.

For more information visit www.gpstpete.com

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IndyCars and a Pro Street Thunderbird Live in Matt Hay’s Garage – Hot Rod Network

Doesn’t everybody have an IndyCar or two in their garage, parked alongside a pink Pro Street Thunderbird? Welcome to Matt and Debbie Hay’s garage. If you are a card-carrying, veteran Car Craft reader and are well versed in Pro Street history, you know Matt and Debbie built the ’Bird at the height of Pro Street’s ascendency. It debuted at the 1988 Street Machine Nationals and, later, the pair sold the car and it traveled into obscurity. In 2013, Family Events brought the Street Machine Nationals back to the fairgrounds in Du Quoin, Illinois, and that reunion motivated Matt and Debbie to reacquire the T-bird. They returned with the resurrected ’Bird in 2014 to a great reception.

Matt has been running a thriving nostalgia motorsports business for nearly 20 years and includes IndyCars as one of his many passions. He buys either cars or bare tubs, refurbishes them, and finds buyers looking for something different. Matt’s business includes all kinds of motorsports nostalgia, which brings him in contact with many notable racers and enthusiasts. Our favorite Matt Hay story revolves around his purchase and cosmetic restoration (without the engine, unfortunately) of one of the two Carroll Shelby turbine cars that attempted to qualify at Indianapolis in 1968. That was the year after Andy Granatelli’s STP turbine car nearly won The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.

Hidden in the garage is Matt’s slingshot 1960s vintage dragster with its early Chrysler hemi block and heads and vintage blower. By the looks of things, its clear Matt and Debbie are still very much involved.

This Aussie Vineyards–sponsored Team Australia car was originally driven by now-Penske driver Will Power. The car is a 2006 Lola that was then powered by a Cosworth XFE 2.65L DOHC V8. These were 12,000-rpm, 700hp engines that are a challenge to drive. Matt worked with an Indianapolis-based team that installed a 1.2L Honda V4 motorcycle engine making around 170 hp at 10,000 rpm. The power is fed through a standard Lola six-speed sequential gearbox. This was a project Matt began to introduce potential owners to the sensation of driving an IndyCar. The intention is to offer a cost-effective way for someone to get into one of these cars and potentially add a better engine later. Matt made several laps at Phoenix International Raceway in it and said that, even down on power, it was mucho fun.This Aussie Vineyards–sponsored Team Australia car was originally driven by now-Penske driver Will Power. The car is a 2006 Lola that was then powered by a Cosworth XFE 2.65L DOHC V8. These were 12,000-rpm, 700hp engines that are a challenge to drive. Matt worked with an Indianapolis-based team that installed a 1.2L Honda V4 motorcycle engine making around 170 hp at 10,000 rpm. The power is fed through a standard Lola six-speed sequential gearbox. This was a project Matt began to introduce potential owners to the sensation of driving an IndyCar. The intention is to offer a cost-effective way for someone to get into one of these cars and potentially add a better engine later. Matt made several laps at Phoenix International Raceway in it and said that, even down on power, it was mucho fun.
This Aussie Vineyards–sponsored Team Australia car was originally driven by now-Penske driver Will Power. The car is a 2006 Lola that was then powered by a Cosworth XFE 2.65L DOHC V8. These were 12,000-rpm, 700hp engines that are a challenge to drive. Matt worked with an Indianapolis-based team that installed a 1.2L Honda V4 motorcycle engine making around 170 hp at 10,000 rpm. The power is fed through a standard Lola six-speed sequential gearbox. This was a project Matt began to introduce potential owners to the sensation of driving an IndyCar. The intention is to offer a cost-effective way for someone to get into one of these cars and potentially add a better engine later. Matt made several laps at Phoenix International Raceway in it and said that, even down on power, it was mucho fun.
The Budweiser car is a 1998 Swift chassis originally powered by a 2.65L Cosworth XD DOHC V8 making 800 hp at 13,000 rpm. That year, it was driven by Richie Hearn in the CART series for the Della Penna Motorsports team. Hearn’s best finish was fifth at Michigan that season. Matt purchased it without an engine and has since sold it.The Budweiser car is a 1998 Swift chassis originally powered by a 2.65L Cosworth XD DOHC V8 making 800 hp at 13,000 rpm. That year, it was driven by Richie Hearn in the CART series for the Della Penna Motorsports team. Hearn’s best finish was fifth at Michigan that season. Matt purchased it without an engine and has since sold it.
The Budweiser car is a 1998 Swift chassis originally powered by a 2.65L Cosworth XD DOHC V8 making 800 hp at 13,000 rpm. That year, it was driven by Richie Hearn in the CART series for the Della Penna Motorsports team. Hearn’s best finish was fifth at Michigan that season. Matt purchased it without an engine and has since sold it.
The green Geico-sponsored car is a 2011 Dallara–chassis, Honda-powered car driven by Tony Kannan that year. Kannan finished in Fourth Place at Indy that year. Like the Bud car, it was a roller and has since found a new home. The green Geico-sponsored car is a 2011 Dallara–chassis, Honda-powered car driven by Tony Kannan that year. Kannan finished in Fourth Place at Indy that year. Like the Bud car, it was a roller and has since found a new home.
The green Geico-sponsored car is a 2011 Dallara–chassis, Honda-powered car driven by Tony Kannan that year. Kannan finished in Fourth Place at Indy that year. Like the Bud car, it was a roller and has since found a new home.
Matt and Debbie originally built the T-Bird in 1988 and won the coveted Pro Street award that year. Perhaps its most distinctive feature is its front-mounted supercharger and DFI electronic fuel control, which was state-of-the-art in the late 1980s. The crank-centerline blower gave the car an extremely low-profile appearance that made it atypical when sitting next to the traditional tall-blower cars of the day. Matt and Debbie originally built the T-Bird in 1988 and won the coveted Pro Street award that year. Perhaps its most distinctive feature is its front-mounted supercharger and DFI electronic fuel control, which was state-of-the-art in the late 1980s. The crank-centerline blower gave the car an extremely low-profile appearance that made it atypical when sitting next to the traditional tall-blower cars of the day.
Matt and Debbie originally built the T-Bird in 1988 and won the coveted Pro Street award that year. Perhaps its most distinctive feature is its front-mounted supercharger and DFI electronic fuel control, which was state-of-the-art in the late 1980s. The crank-centerline blower gave the car an extremely low-profile appearance that made it atypical when sitting next to the traditional tall-blower cars of the day.

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