HOT ROD Rescue: EZ-EFI Issues on 1967 Corvette Traced to Bad Valve Seals – Hot Rod Network

The 350 in Bill Hedekin’s 1967 Corvette Backfires, Stalls, and Uses Oil. Time for HOT ROD to Fix It.

Bill and Linda Hedekin bought their vintage 1967 Corvette in the late 1970s. The ex–road racer has long since been returned to the street.Bill and Linda Hedekin bought their vintage 1967 Corvette in the late 1970s. The ex–road racer has long since been returned to the street.
Bill and Linda Hedekin bought their vintage 1967 Corvette in the late 1970s. The ex–road racer has long since been returned to the street.

The Combo

Bill Hedekin’s 1967 Corvette should have been a runner. Once a late-1960s-style SCCA B/Production road racer, the car was returned to street duty, still equipped with a vintage 355ci Mouse with fuelie heads and vintage Edelbrock Torker single-plane intake—but upgraded and rebuilt with Total Seal piston rings, a modern Comp Cams Magnum 280HR hydraulic roller cam, an MSD-6AL ignition, and a FAST EZ-EFI self-tuning, throttle-body fuel injection. Power is transferred back through an M21 Muncie close-ratio, four-speed manual trans to a 3.73:1 Posi IRS.

The vintage small-bock was rebuilt a few years ago with a big hydraulic roller cam and EZ-EFI. It had poor driveability and burned oil.The vintage small-bock was rebuilt a few years ago with a big hydraulic roller cam and EZ-EFI. It had poor driveability and burned oil.
The vintage small-bock was rebuilt a few years ago with a big hydraulic roller cam and EZ-EFI. It had poor driveability and burned oil.

The Problem

After the engine refresh, “The car never seemed to be right,” Hedekin says. “It popped and banged whenever I backed off the gas, like a backfire from an old-fashioned carburetor. It always starts fine, but cuts out under throttle. There’s always oil on the [spark] plugs. I’ve changed the plugs myself three or four times, even tried specialty plugs. Several shops tried to tune it. Nothing really helped.” In his rescue request interview, Hedekin primarily blamed the EFI, mentioning the oil-fouled plugs only in passing. When pressed, he allowed, “The car does burn some oil—probably 1 quart every 100 miles.”

The Diagnosis

One of a vanishing breed of full-service auto-repair shops, Norm Rollings can fix anything—early to late, stocker to race car. One of a vanishing breed of full-service auto-repair shops, Norm Rollings can fix anything—early to late, stocker to race car.
One of a vanishing breed of full-service auto-repair shops, Norm Rollings can fix anything—early to late, stocker to race car.

We sent the Diamond Bar, California–based car to Rollings Automotive, a full-service shop in Mira Loma, California. Owner Norm Rollings immediately homed in on the oil consumption—not the EFI—as the primary stumbling block. Explains Rollings, “You don’t lose that much oil unless there’s something physically wrong. EFI won’t work right with an oil-use problem. Oil attacks the O2 sensor, which messes up everything, including the system’s self-tuning ability. We needed to find out where the oil was coming from.

“The first step was to look at engine vacuum. A vacuum leak can suck oil into the [intake] manifold runners, from a poor manifold-to-head intake-surface seal or even the wrong intake gasket. That can be tough to find because it can be sucking in from the bottom (the valley side, underneath the manifold). But vacuum was still about 15 inches, even though a vacuum hose had fallen off.

“The disconnected hose did cause the fuel pressure regulator to go to maximum pressure at idle, which will contribute to the driveability issues, but sticking the hose back on produced no significant change in vacuum or driveability for the moment.”

Vacuum was an acceptable 15 inches, even though a hose had fallen off the throttle-body. The hose’s other end connects to the fuel pressure regulator, but hooking it back up didn’t initially improve driveability. Vacuum was an acceptable 15 inches, even though a hose had fallen off the throttle-body. The hose’s other end connects to the fuel pressure regulator, but hooking it back up didn’t initially improve driveability.
Vacuum was an acceptable 15 inches, even though a hose had fallen off the throttle-body. The hose’s other end connects to the fuel pressure regulator, but hooking it back up didn’t initially improve driveability.

“We then pulled the [spark] plugs. They were really contaminated with oil. We did a leakdown and compression test. The cylinders had good compression and only 8- to 10-percent leakage, which is about ballpark for Total Seal rings on a street car, so it probably wasn’t the rings or valve seats.”

Engine compression and leakdown test readings were normal, but the spark plugs were oil-fouled. Engine compression and leakdown test readings were normal, but the spark plugs were oil-fouled.
Engine compression and leakdown test readings were normal, but the spark plugs were oil-fouled.

“Next we pulled the valve covers to check the valve-guide slop on the engine’s rare camel-hump factory heads. To measure this, we had to pull the valvesprings. In the process, we found a broken inner damper. This made us question the integrity of all the springs.”

Several valvesprings had broken dampers. Several valvesprings had broken dampers.
Several valvesprings had broken dampers.

Hedekin says the springs were “an old Z28 design that fit the stock valvespring pocket.” Z28 springs were designed for the old lazy stock solid lifter cams and they don’t really have enough pressure to support today’s hydraulic roller cams.

Springs removed, Rollings observed, “The heads still had old OE umbrella valve seals. Today we machine the guides for positive-stop seals. They offer better oil control in all cases, but with Hedekin’s high-lift cam, positive-stop seals are mandatory: The big lift was crushing the seals into the top of the valveguide; we could visually see there was contact. The old seals could only support around 0.470 lift, but Hedekin’s cam had 0.525 lift. But at least the heads’ bronze valve guides were still nice and tight. So in terms of oil consumption, the only problem was retainer-to-seal interference. The crushed seals let oil run right down the guides. Engine vacuum sucked oil down the valve stem into the engine.”

High oil use was traced to umbrella-type valve seals getting crushed by the spring retainers. The seals were too tall for a 0.525-inch-lift cam.High oil use was traced to umbrella-type valve seals getting crushed by the spring retainers. The seals were too tall for a 0.525-inch-lift cam.
High oil use was traced to umbrella-type valve seals getting crushed by the spring retainers. The seals were too tall for a 0.525-inch-lift cam.

The minimalist (and more affordable) approach is modifying the existing heads to accept modern springs and positive-stop–style valve seals. The Daddy Warbucks method is a top-end swap to modern aftermarket aluminum heads. We’ll show you both ways to go.

The Fix: Existing Heads

To install positive-stop valve seals, remove and disassemble the heads, then machine the top of the guide with a special cutter and arbor. The cutter (A) must match the guide od and the arbor (pilot, B) the valve-stem od. These old Chevy heads had 0.530-inch-od guides and stock 11⁄32-inch valve stems. Comp Cams sells the correct cutter under PN 4726 and the arbor under PN 4732.To install positive-stop valve seals, remove and disassemble the heads, then machine the top of the guide with a special cutter and arbor. The cutter (A) must match the guide od and the arbor (pilot, B) the valve-stem od. These old Chevy heads had 0.530-inch-od guides and stock 11⁄32-inch valve stems. Comp Cams sells the correct cutter under PN 4726 and the arbor under PN 4732.
To install positive-stop valve seals, remove and disassemble the heads, then machine the top of the guide with a special cutter and arbor. The cutter (A) must match the guide od and the arbor (pilot, B) the valve-stem od. These old Chevy heads had 0.530-inch-od guides and stock 11⁄32-inch valve stems. Comp Cams sells the correct cutter under PN 4726 and the arbor under PN 4732.
The guides can be cut at home using a common hand drill. Rollings usually places a thick valvespring seat insert in the pocket to protect the guide during the machining process, then cuts the “chimney” portion of the stock guide down about 0.200 inch to where it widens out.The guides can be cut at home using a common hand drill. Rollings usually places a thick valvespring seat insert in the pocket to protect the guide during the machining process, then cuts the “chimney” portion of the stock guide down about 0.200 inch to where it widens out.
The guides can be cut at home using a common hand drill. Rollings usually places a thick valvespring seat insert in the pocket to protect the guide during the machining process, then cuts the “chimney” portion of the stock guide down about 0.200 inch to where it widens out.

“Original positive-stop or ‘PC seals’ were made from Teflon,” Rollings explains. “They’re OK for the race engines they were originally developed for, but today’s street motors don’t like a pure Teflon-based seal. They’re not malleable enough to conform to the valve stem and can also wear the stem where the seal’s ‘cylinder’ rides. Instead we use a Viton-based seal, with a spring around it for radial tension. It doesn’t harden, and it’s not affected by heat-cycling. It wipes oil off the stem like a windshield-wiper blade wipes water off the windshield.” Modifying the valve guides for positive-stop seals is easily done at home with a hand drill and the appropriate arbor and cutter tooling available through Comp Cams.

Here, the right-hand guide pair is still unmachined. The bronze wall guides’ “chimney” still sticks up out of the guide casting. On the finished left-hand pair, the guide has been lowered about 0.200 inch and its major diameter decreased. The chimney is now flush with the top of the guide.Here, the right-hand guide pair is still unmachined. The bronze wall guides’ “chimney” still sticks up out of the guide casting. On the finished left-hand pair, the guide has been lowered about 0.200 inch and its major diameter decreased. The chimney is now flush with the top of the guide.
Here, the right-hand guide pair is still unmachined. The bronze wall guides’ “chimney” still sticks up out of the guide casting. On the finished left-hand pair, the guide has been lowered about 0.200 inch and its major diameter decreased. The chimney is now flush with the top of the guide.
The cut-down guides provide up to 0.881-inch clearance between the bottom of the retainer and the top of the guide. Subtracting 0.100-inch to allow for the new seal height plus a 0.060-inch safety margin in case of valve float, still leaves sufficient clearance for a 0.721-inch-lift cam. (Hedekin’s cam has 0.525-inch lift with his existing 1.5:1 Comp Pro-Magnum roller rockers.)The cut-down guides provide up to 0.881-inch clearance between the bottom of the retainer and the top of the guide. Subtracting 0.100-inch to allow for the new seal height plus a 0.060-inch safety margin in case of valve float, still leaves sufficient clearance for a 0.721-inch-lift cam. (Hedekin’s cam has 0.525-inch lift with his existing 1.5:1 Comp Pro-Magnum roller rockers.)
The cut-down guides provide up to 0.881-inch clearance between the bottom of the retainer and the top of the guide. Subtracting 0.100-inch to allow for the new seal height plus a 0.060-inch safety margin in case of valve float, still leaves sufficient clearance for a 0.721-inch-lift cam. (Hedekin’s cam has 0.525-inch lift with his existing 1.5:1 Comp Pro-Magnum roller rockers.)

The valvespring issue was harder to resolve. Back in the day, the usual approach was machining the spring pockets oversize to accept double (or even triple) springs. But this doesn’t always work for all heads. Hedekin had No. 492 castings; those made before 1972 have thin spring pockets and machining them with a traditional flat seat cutter may break through into the water jacket. Special stepped cutters are available, but Rollings says they’re not compatible with his preferred modern, hydraulic-roller-cam-compatible spring designs. In any event, there was also insufficient material between the outer pockets and head-bolt holes on each end of the head to adequately support larger springs.

This is a classic small-block No. 461 early camel-hump “fuelie” head. Its stock 1.290-inch spring seats have been cut oversize for these 1.430-inch-od triple race springs—yet there’s still enough material (arrows) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt/stud hole at the end of the head to support the wider spring; the casting material does not have a steep drop off.This is a classic small-block No. 461 early camel-hump “fuelie” head. Its stock 1.290-inch spring seats have been cut oversize for these 1.430-inch-od triple race springs—yet there’s still enough material (arrows) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt/stud hole at the end of the head to support the wider spring; the casting material does not have a steep drop off.
This is a classic small-block No. 461 early camel-hump “fuelie” head. Its stock 1.290-inch spring seats have been cut oversize for these 1.430-inch-od triple race springs—yet there’s still enough material (arrows) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt/stud hole at the end of the head to support the wider spring; the casting material does not have a steep drop off.
This is Hedekin’s later No. 492 head with the conical spring and positive-stop seal installed in the stock 1.290-inch seat. This casting lacks sufficient material (arrow) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt hole at the end of the head to support a large-diameter pocket; the casting wall “drops off a cliff,” which would leave a larger-diameter spring “hanging in the wind.”This is Hedekin’s later No. 492 head with the conical spring and positive-stop seal installed in the stock 1.290-inch seat. This casting lacks sufficient material (arrow) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt hole at the end of the head to support a large-diameter pocket; the casting wall “drops off a cliff,” which would leave a larger-diameter spring “hanging in the wind.”
This is Hedekin’s later No. 492 head with the conical spring and positive-stop seal installed in the stock 1.290-inch seat. This casting lacks sufficient material (arrow) between the pocket’s outer edge and the head bolt hole at the end of the head to support a large-diameter pocket; the casting wall “drops off a cliff,” which would leave a larger-diameter spring “hanging in the wind.”

What was needed was a spring and retainer that fit the stock pocket while developing adequate pressure for the hydraulic roller cam. Enter a Comp Cams conical spring and retainer combo originally developed for today’s LS engines with their small spring pockets and 8mm valve stems. Conical springs increase the valvetrain rpm limit, reduce resonance, and decrease dynamic spring oscillations. The result: longer spring life and the ability to run more aggressive cams. Comp offers a hybrid 7-degree lock that allows installing this spring and retainer on an old small-block’s 11/32-inch valve stems. On paper, the conicals are designed to generate the desired seat and open pressures at the usual small-block 1.800-inch installed height.

As it turns out, the new springs’ retainers are effectively thicker than the retainers used with conventional springs; with no other changes, the installed height ends up about 0.100-inch shorter, considerably raising spring pressures (table). Even so, Comp Cams’ Valvetrain Group Manager Billy Godbold maintains these higher than “normal” pressures are still OK with a hydraulic roller. With Hedekin’s 0.525-inch-lift cam, there’s still 0.050 inch remaining until coil bind. That’s a little tight according to old-school theory, but again, Godbold isn’t worried: “Due the conical spring’s unique design, it actually likes and performs best when installed close to coil-bind.”

Valvespring Pressures

Conical spring PN 7228-16 with Retainer PN 774-16

Valve Length Installed Height Seat Pressure Open Pressure Coil-Bind Height Distance to Coil-Bind
With 0.525-inch valve-lift (Hedekin’s existing cam)
Stock 1.700″ 180 lbs 410 lbs 1.125” 0.050”
Plus 0.100″ 1.800″ 136 lbs 366 lbs 1.125” 0.150”
With 0.650-inch valve-lift (max safe valve lift supported)
Plus 0.100″ 1.800″ 136 lbs 421 lbs 1.12”5 0.025”
The distance on the smaller-od (but thicker in height) conical spring retainer is actually greater from the valve locks to the spring-to-retainer lip contact point than it is with a conventional retainer. With no other changes, the conical’s 1.700-inch installed height (right) ends up at 1.700 inch, 0.100-inch shorter compared to a “standard” spring and retainer (left) installed in the existing pocket at 1.800 inch. The distance on the smaller-od (but thicker in height) conical spring retainer is actually greater from the valve locks to the spring-to-retainer lip contact point than it is with a conventional retainer. With no other changes, the conical’s 1.700-inch installed height (right) ends up at 1.700 inch, 0.100-inch shorter compared to a “standard” spring and retainer (left) installed in the existing pocket at 1.800 inch.
The distance on the smaller-od (but thicker in height) conical spring retainer is actually greater from the valve locks to the spring-to-retainer lip contact point than it is with a conventional retainer. With no other changes, the conical’s 1.700-inch installed height (right) ends up at 1.700 inch, 0.100-inch shorter compared to a “standard” spring and retainer (left) installed in the existing pocket at 1.800 inch.

If (as is the case on 492 heads) the pocket can’t be deepened and you’re uncomfortable with a shorter installed height, don’t want such high seat pressures, and/or have an even higher-lift cam, the first step is offset valve locks, which offer about 0.050 inch more clearance. The next step is 0.100-inch longer-than-stock valves. On a small-block Chevy, “plus-0.100” valves require about 0.100-inch longer pushrods to restore proper valve­train geometry—assuming the existing pushrod lengths were correct in the first place. The cam’s base circle diameter, lifter height, head-gasket thickness, and the amount the block and heads were milled also influence pushrod length. Rollings recommends mocking up the motor and using a Manley pushrod checker to positively determine the proper length.

To compensate for the thicker retainers, Rollings installed 0.100-inch longer-than-stock SI stainless steel valves. Use at least a 0.015-inch shim to prevent seat erosion from the valvespring’s harder chrome-moly steel. Here, you can see the Comp conical springs, positive-stop seals fully installed, new valves, and shims in the process of assembly.To compensate for the thicker retainers, Rollings installed 0.100-inch longer-than-stock SI stainless steel valves. Use at least a 0.015-inch shim to prevent seat erosion from the valvespring’s harder chrome-moly steel. Here, you can see the Comp conical springs, positive-stop seals fully installed, new valves, and shims in the process of assembly.
To compensate for the thicker retainers, Rollings installed 0.100-inch longer-than-stock SI stainless steel valves. Use at least a 0.015-inch shim to prevent seat erosion from the valvespring’s harder chrome-moly steel. Here, you can see the Comp conical springs, positive-stop seals fully installed, new valves, and shims in the process of assembly.

The Fix: Edelbrock Heads

In the end, owner Hedekin thought it was an opportune time to upgrade to a set of modern, free-flowing Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. They deliver great throttle response and power from 1,500–6,500 rpm, shed front-end weight, and come in several bare and fully assembled variations for compatibility with modern cams and unleaded fuel. (Photo: Edelbrock LLC) In the end, owner Hedekin thought it was an opportune time to upgrade to a set of modern, free-flowing Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. They deliver great throttle response and power from 1,500–6,500 rpm, shed front-end weight, and come in several bare and fully assembled variations for compatibility with modern cams and unleaded fuel. (Photo: Edelbrock LLC)
In the end, owner Hedekin thought it was an opportune time to upgrade to a set of modern, free-flowing Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. They deliver great throttle response and power from 1,500–6,500 rpm, shed front-end weight, and come in several bare and fully assembled variations for compatibility with modern cams and unleaded fuel.
(Photo: Edelbrock LLC)
The same Fel-Pro Performance-series head gasket (PN 1003, shown), intake set, and valve-cover gasket work on both the old GM and the new Edelbrock heads. The head gasket features a flattened stainless steel fire ring that minimizes aluminum head brinelling while providing optimum sealing. Use a thread-chaser tap to clean out the old corroded head-bolt holes.The same Fel-Pro Performance-series head gasket (PN 1003, shown), intake set, and valve-cover gasket work on both the old GM and the new Edelbrock heads. The head gasket features a flattened stainless steel fire ring that minimizes aluminum head brinelling while providing optimum sealing. Use a thread-chaser tap to clean out the old corroded head-bolt holes.
The same Fel-Pro Performance-series head gasket (PN 1003, shown), intake set, and valve-cover gasket work on both the old GM and the new Edelbrock heads. The head gasket features a flattened stainless steel fire ring that minimizes aluminum head brinelling while providing optimum sealing. Use a thread-chaser tap to clean out the old corroded head-bolt holes.

The other solution—and the one Hedekin self-selected—was swapping on modern Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. Perfect for street performance, daily drivers, street rods, and muscle cars, the specific version installed on the Vette (PN 60895) has 64cc combustion chambers and straight spark-plug holes, and comes fully assembled with hydraulic-roller-cam-compatible springs. They bolted right on to the Vette’s existing short-block. The only glitch was due to the new heads’ slightly taller valve-cover rails: One of Hedekin’s existing Chevrolet Performance bow-tie valve covers had to be notched at the rear driver-side to clear the Vette’s power-brake vacuum booster. Hedekin also had Rollings replace his old Torker intake with an Edelbrock Air-Gap dual-plane unit (PN 7501).

On the driver side, the Edelbrock heads’ taller valve-cover rails caused the rear outer corner on the owner’s existing Chevrolet Performance bow-tie valve cover to hit the power-brake vacuum booster. Michael Cox Racing Development notched and reshaped the cast-aluminum cover for clearance, then Rollings retouched it with VHT black-wrinkle paint.On the driver side, the Edelbrock heads’ taller valve-cover rails caused the rear outer corner on the owner’s existing Chevrolet Performance bow-tie valve cover to hit the power-brake vacuum booster. Michael Cox Racing Development notched and reshaped the cast-aluminum cover for clearance, then Rollings retouched it with VHT black-wrinkle paint.
On the driver side, the Edelbrock heads’ taller valve-cover rails caused the rear outer corner on the owner’s existing Chevrolet Performance bow-tie valve cover to hit the power-brake vacuum booster. Michael Cox Racing Development notched and reshaped the cast-aluminum cover for clearance, then Rollings retouched it with VHT black-wrinkle paint.
Rollings trash-canned the old corroded head bolts. ARP’s High Performance–series small-block Chevy bolt kit (PN 134-3601) fits the OE iron as well as Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. Since the bolts go into the water jacket, be sure to put a Teflon-based sealant on the threads to prevent weeping.Rollings trash-canned the old corroded head bolts. ARP’s High Performance–series small-block Chevy bolt kit (PN 134-3601) fits the OE iron as well as Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. Since the bolts go into the water jacket, be sure to put a Teflon-based sealant on the threads to prevent weeping.
Rollings trash-canned the old corroded head bolts. ARP’s High Performance–series small-block Chevy bolt kit (PN 134-3601) fits the OE iron as well as Edelbrock Performer RPM heads. Since the bolts go into the water jacket, be sure to put a Teflon-based sealant on the threads to prevent weeping.

The Fix: EZ-EFI

Engine buttoned up, Rollings addressed the EFI: “We checked the fuel pressure. It was roughly 38 psi when it should have been 50. Whenever we accelerated, the fuel pressure went down to 30 psi or less. It should have gone up along with rpm. This was even with the now-reconnected vacuum hose (arrows), so we knew we had either a fuel-pump or fuel-filter problem.”Engine buttoned up, Rollings addressed the EFI: “We checked the fuel pressure. It was roughly 38 psi when it should have been 50. Whenever we accelerated, the fuel pressure went down to 30 psi or less. It should have gone up along with rpm. This was even with the now-reconnected vacuum hose (arrows), so we knew we had either a fuel-pump or fuel-filter problem.”
Engine buttoned up, Rollings addressed the EFI: “We checked the fuel pressure. It was roughly 38 psi when it should have been 50. Whenever we accelerated, the fuel pressure went down to 30 psi or less. It should have gone up along with rpm. This was even with the now-reconnected vacuum hose (arrows), so we knew we had either a fuel-pump or fuel-filter problem.”
Rollings discovered debris plugging the Vette’s rear-mounted, screen-style fuel filter.Rollings discovered debris plugging the Vette’s rear-mounted, screen-style fuel filter.
Rollings discovered debris plugging the Vette’s rear-mounted, screen-style fuel filter.

Oil consumption solved and new heads installed, the EZ-EFI was cleared and put into self-tune mode. Idle and part-throttle after warm-up quickly normalized. However, accelerating hard, the engine shut off under load. The fuel pressure was actually declining as rpm rose, when it should have gone up. This indicates either a fuel-pump or fuel-filter problem. Rollings found a clogged fine-mesh screen in a fuel filter poorly located between the fuel tank and fuel pump. As there already was a larger fuel filter installed after the pump, Rollings simply removed the redundant screen filter, then set the fuel pressure regulator to 55 psi. Fuel pressure issue rectified, the only additional manual tweak needed was dialing in a little more cold-start enrichment.

The Vette had a fuel filter (A) installed between the tank and pump. Rollings says, “I don’t like a filter in that location because it can pull vacuum, but in this case, it was even worse: Inside the filter there was a 1-inch disk with a fine-mesh screen that was plugged up with debris.” There’s another filter (B) after the pump—as there should be—so Rollings removed the upstream filter. The Vette had a fuel filter (A) installed between the tank and pump. Rollings says, “I don’t like a filter in that location because it can pull vacuum, but in this case, it was even worse: Inside the filter there was a 1-inch disk with a fine-mesh screen that was plugged up with debris.” There’s another filter (B) after the pump—as there should be—so Rollings removed the upstream filter.
The Vette had a fuel filter (A) installed between the tank and pump. Rollings says, “I don’t like a filter in that location because it can pull vacuum, but in this case, it was even worse: Inside the filter there was a 1-inch disk with a fine-mesh screen that was plugged up with debris.” There’s another filter (B) after the pump—as there should be—so Rollings removed the upstream filter.
“Once we set all the basic adjustments on the supplied handheld tuner,” Rollings explains, “the system was able to do its own tuning, and the car now runs fine. We did have to manually supply ‘more choke’ at cold start-up by turning the cold-start enrichment screen on the handheld tuner up a couple of clicks.”“Once we set all the basic adjustments on the supplied handheld tuner,” Rollings explains, “the system was able to do its own tuning, and the car now runs fine. We did have to manually supply ‘more choke’ at cold start-up by turning the cold-start enrichment screen on the handheld tuner up a couple of clicks.”
“Once we set all the basic adjustments on the supplied handheld tuner,” Rollings explains, “the system was able to do its own tuning, and the car now runs fine. We did have to manually supply ‘more choke’ at cold start-up by turning the cold-start enrichment screen on the handheld tuner up a couple of clicks.”

Lessons Learned

Don’t be quick to blame fuel injection because you’re not familiar with it. This wasn’t a fuel-injection issue; it was a mechanical issue.” — Norm Rollings

Don’t just bolt things together. You must be sure the valvespring is compatible with the cam, the retainer-to-valve guide and valve-seal clearance is right, and the spring’s installed height develops the recommended pressures without going into coil bind. Don’t use a fine-screen filter between the fuel tank and fuel pump. Make sure the engine internals, the electrical system, and the fuel-supply system are up to snuff before casting blame on the fuel injection.

New life for an old Corvette: Rescue complete, the classic Vette’s engine bay proudly shows the new Edelbrock heads, the Air-Gap intake that replaced his ancient Torker, and the now-perfected EZ-EFI system. Hedekin’s next goal: Install a newfangled electric air-conditioning system.New life for an old Corvette: Rescue complete, the classic Vette’s engine bay proudly shows the new Edelbrock heads, the Air-Gap intake that replaced his ancient Torker, and the now-perfected EZ-EFI system. Hedekin’s next goal: Install a newfangled electric air-conditioning system.
New life for an old Corvette: Rescue complete, the classic Vette’s engine bay proudly shows the new Edelbrock heads, the Air-Gap intake that replaced his ancient Torker, and the now-perfected EZ-EFI system. Hedekin’s next goal: Install a newfangled electric air-conditioning system.

 

Parts and Prices
Does not include shipping fees, miscellaneous small hardware, standard sealants, or sales taxes. Labor is included only if cannot be performed by the average home mechanic. Priced 11/06/16 and subject to change. All dimensions in linear inches, except as noted.
Brand Part Description Part No. Amt. Price
From Cost
A. Common Parts

These parts are needed with all options (B, C, and D) listed below.

ARP BOLT KIT, engine cylinder head, high-performance series, hex-head, most OE and Edelbrock 23° heads 134-3601 1 Summit $86.39
SEALANT, thread, 1.69 fl-oz, PTFE w/ rust & corrosion inhibitors 100-9904 1 Summit $10.28
Fel-Pro GASKET SET, exhaust header, perforated steel core w/ antistick coating, 1.50 × 1.50 square ports (2/pkg.) 1404 1 RockAuto $14.18
GASKET SET, intake manifold, composite w/ Printoseal, 1.28 × 2.09 port size, no exhaust crossover 1205 1 RockAuto $14.15
GASKET, carburetor or throttle-body mounting, Carter AFB/Holley 4150 dual-pattern, open plenum, 1/32 thk 1914 1 RockAuto $4.26
GASKET, cylinder head, steel-core laminate w/ preflattened steel wire, 4.190-bore × 0.041 thk., 9cc vol. 1004 2 RockAuto $36.79
Gates HOSE, windshield washer & vacuum, 7⁄32 id, bulk, sold per foot (cut-to-length) 27043 2 ft O’Reilly $1.38
Lucas OIL, engine, hydrocarbon, Hot Rod and Classic Car, 20W-50, 5qt jug 10684-1 1 Summit $35.97
O’Reilly COOLANT, engine, ethylene glycol, concentrate, conventional “green”, 1-gal. jug GAL 2 O’Reilly $25.98
Prestone HOSE, power steering return, ⅜ id × 2ft ol package (used by Rollings as fuel hose, cut-to-length) PS0308 1 O’Reilly $4.69
Summit TAP SET, thread chasing & cleanup, cadmium-plated steel, UNC, inc. ¼-20, 5⁄16-18, ⅜-16, 7⁄16-14, ½-13, 9⁄16-12 900200 1 Summit $15.97
Wix FILTER, oil, 5.178 ol × 3.660 id, 1 3⁄16-16 mounting thread, 21-micron particle filtering, 270-psi burst 51060 1 RockAuto $2.11
A. Common Parts Subtotal $268.94
B. Stock Heads With Stock Valves

Also needed: All parts listed in section A (common parts), above.

ACCEL PLUG, spark, C-cut electrode, 14mm thread, 13⁄16 hex, 0.375 reach, gasket-seat, projected tip, resistor, short backshell (8/pkg.) 8197 1 Summit $30.57
Comp Cams ARBOR/PILOT, valve seat & guide cutter, steel, 11⁄32 valve stem 4732 1 Comp $19.70
CUTTER, carbide-tip, cuts 0.530 valve guide 4726 1 Comp $44.23
KEY PKG., engine valvespring, machined steel, single groove, 7°, 11⁄32 valve stem (32/pkg) 648-16 1 Comp $23.19
RETAINER KIT, engine valvespring, steel, 7°, 0.640 id × 1.055 od 774-16 1 Summit $53.97
SEAL PKG., valve stem oil, positive stop, Viton w/ metal body, 11⁄32 valve stem, 0.530 guide, 0.575od 518-16 1 Comp $16.24
SPRING KIT, engine valve, single conical, 1.020/1.290 OD × 0.920 ID, 438 lb/in rate, 1.125 coil-bind height 7228-16 1 Comp $253.92
Dura-Bond SHIM PKG., engine valvespring, steel, 0.625 id × 1.250 od × 0.015 thk (100/pkg., 16 used) 1055 1 Summit $16.97
B. Stock Heads and Valves Subtotal $458.79
Total, Including Common Parts (A+B) $747.73
C. Add Long Valves to Stock Heads

Also needed: All parts listed in sections A (common parts) and B (stock heads with stock valves), above.

Comp Cams ROD SET, engine valve push, Magnum, 0.080-wall, hardened chrome moly steel, 5⁄16 od × 7.400 ol* 7638-16 1 Summit $104.00
Manley GAUGE, pushrod length checker, Chevrolet, small-block, ⅜ rocker stud 42137 1 Summit $16.97
SI Valves VALVE, exhaust, Competition Series, stainless steel, 0.250 Stellite tip, 1 lock-groove, 2.020 head od, 0.3415od chromed stem undercut near head, 5.010 ol (+0.100 over stock) 1402SG 8 RPM $86.16
VALVE, intake, Competition Series, stainless steel, 0.250 Stellite tip, 1 lock-groove, 1.600 head od, 0.3415od chromed stem undercut near head, 5.013 ol (+0.100 over stock) 1451SG+100 8 RPM $86.16
C. Stock Heads with Long Valves Subtotal $293.29
Total, Including common Parts & Stock Heads (A+B+C) $1,041.02
D. Full Top-End Conversion

Also needed: All parts listed in section A (common parts), above.

Champion PLUG, spark, Copper Plus, 14mm thread, ⅝ hex, 0.750 reach, gasket-seat, projected tip, resistor RC12YC 8 RockAuto $10.48
Edelbrock HEAD ASY., engine cylinder, Performer RPM, aluminum, 195/65cc port vol. 2.02/1.60 valves, 64cc chambers, straight plugs, 1.46-od springs for hydraulic-roller cam, 0.575 max lift 60895 2 Summit $1,459.00
MANIFOLD, engine fuel intake, RPM Air-Gap, 1,500–6,500 rpm operating range, aluminum, satin finish 7501 1 Summit $273.34
Mike Cox LABOR & FABRICATION, notch valve cover for brake vacuum booster clearance Rollings $150.00
VHT PAINT, Wrinkle Plus, black, 11oz aerosol can (used to retouch notched valve cover) SP201 1 Summit $12.97
*Nominal for small-block Chevy with conventional 23° heads, retrofit hydraulic-roller cam and lifters, and 0.100-inch longer-than-stock valves. Your combo may vary. Be sure and check! D. Full Top-End Conversion Subtotal $1,905.79
Total , Top-End conversion Plus Common Parts (A+D) $2,194.73
The old GM heads were machined for positive-stop seals, then upgraded with Comp Cams conical springs and 0.100-inch-longer SI valves.The old GM heads were machined for positive-stop seals, then upgraded with Comp Cams conical springs and 0.100-inch-longer SI valves.
The old GM heads were machined for positive-stop seals, then upgraded with Comp Cams conical springs and 0.100-inch-longer SI valves.
After resolving the mechanical issues, sorting out the EZ-EFI was easy. Now the Hedekins can handle those mountain twistys in style.After resolving the mechanical issues, sorting out the EZ-EFI was easy. Now the Hedekins can handle those mountain twistys in style.
After resolving the mechanical issues, sorting out the EZ-EFI was easy. Now the Hedekins can handle those mountain twistys in style.
There was so much oil in the motor, the pistons and cylinder head combustion chambers had a ton of carbon buildup. Rollings explains, “Carbon particles glow at high temperature, which can promote preignition when fuel is introduced. We removed them using Scotch-Brite, gasket scrapers, carb cleaner, and lots of elbow grease.”There was so much oil in the motor, the pistons and cylinder head combustion chambers had a ton of carbon buildup. Rollings explains, “Carbon particles glow at high temperature, which can promote preignition when fuel is introduced. We removed them using Scotch-Brite, gasket scrapers, carb cleaner, and lots of elbow grease.”
There was so much oil in the motor, the pistons and cylinder head combustion chambers had a ton of carbon buildup. Rollings explains, “Carbon particles glow at high temperature, which can promote preignition when fuel is introduced. We removed them using Scotch-Brite, gasket scrapers, carb cleaner, and lots of elbow grease.”
Rollings applies a little silicone sealant in the last ½ inch of the trough area between the intake manifold corners and the head-gasket surface to prevent weeping. The “dimples” on the block China wall show you just how old the vintage block was; it was an old-school end-gasket sealing trick before silicone became available.Rollings applies a little silicone sealant in the last ½ inch of the trough area between the intake manifold corners and the head-gasket surface to prevent weeping. The “dimples” on the block China wall show you just how old the vintage block was; it was an old-school end-gasket sealing trick before silicone became available.
Rollings applies a little silicone sealant in the last ½ inch of the trough area between the intake manifold corners and the head-gasket surface to prevent weeping. The “dimples” on the block China wall show you just how old the vintage block was; it was an old-school end-gasket sealing trick before silicone became available.

Contacts:

Accel, a Holley Performance Brand; Bowling Green, KY; 866.464.6553; Holley.com/brands/accel/

Automotive Racing Products (ARP); Ventura, CA; 800.826.3045 or 805.339.2200; ARP-Bolts.com

Champion—Fel-Pro (Federal-Mogul Corp.); Southfield, MI; 800.325.8886; ChampionAutoParts.com, FelPro-Only.com, or FMe-cat.com

Comp Cams; Memphis, TN; 800.999.0853 or 901.795.2400; CompCams.com

Dura-Bond Bearing Co.; Carson City, NV; 775.883.8998; Dura-BondBearing.com

Edelbrock LLC; Torrance, CA; 800.416.8628 (tech) or 310.781.7222 (general); Edelbrock.com

Gates Corp.; Denver, CO; 303.744.5651; Gates.com

Lucas Oil Products Inc.; Corona, CA; 800.342.2512 or 951.270.0154; LucasOil.com

Manley Performance Products Inc.; Lakewood, NJ; 800.526.1362 or 732.905.3366; ManleyPerformance.com

Michael Cox Racing Development; Jurupa Valley, CA; 714.376.6113; Mwc247@gmail.com

O’Reilly Auto Parts; Springfield, MO; 888.327.7153 or 417.829.5727; OReillyAuto.com

Prestone Products Corp.; Danbury, CT; 888.269.0750; Prestone.com

RockAuto LLC; Madison, WI; 866.ROCKAUTO or 608.661.1376; RockAuto.com

Rollings Automotive Inc.; Mira Loma, CA; 951.361.3001; Plus.Google.com/+RollingsAutomotiveIncMiraLoma

RPM—Ron’s Precision Machine, Inc.; Santaquin, UT; 866.700.5877 or 801.754.5338; RpmRons.com

SI Valves; Simi Valley, CA; 800.564.8258 or 805.582.0085; SIvalves.com

Summit Racing Equipment; Akron, OH; 800.230.3030 (orders) or 330.630.0240 (tech); SummitRacing.com

VHT Paints, a Division of Dupli-Color, Inc., a Sherwin-Williams Co.; 800.247.3270; Cleveland, OH; VHTpaint.com

Wix Filters; Gastonia, NC; 704.869.3421 (customer service), 704.864.6748 (sales), or 800.949.6698 (USA, product information); WixFilters.com


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Mopars Hit Hard At The Gatornats! Huge Super Stock Gallery! – Hot Rod Network

The NHRA has started its big national event tour in the East at Gainesville Raceway in Florida for the past 48 seasons. Traditionally held in March, thousands of fans come down from cooler climes in the North to enjoy the weather of the Sunshine State and witness often record-setting times. The Gators were blessed with excellent conditions again for 2017. Of course, for those of us with a traditional sense of Mopar history, it is a wide variety of wheels-up Stockers and Super Stockers that makes this event a lot of fun. Coupled to special displays and exhibition runs, it was again a non-stop weekend of color and speed.

One big deal at this year’s event was the season debut of the School Of automotive Machinists (SAM) Factory Stock Showdown, which features late-model Drag Pak Challengers against Cobra Jet Mastangs and COPO Camaros. This is now a combined class of FS/XX supercharged and FS/X normally-aspirated entries, though the Gators program participants were all blown XX models. Geoff Turk, whose “Blackbird SR354” Drag Pak raced in Super Stock last season, was the only Dodge ready for this early season event, having spent most of March testing between Florida and his home in Illinois. There were 17 cars pushing for an elite qualified field of eight finalists. Anyone in XX or X trim who did not make the Showdown could be rotated back down into the normal Stock Eliminator program; the finalists would run a round on Saturday and the final two rounds on Sunday.

Turk, who campaigns the stealth-black car with the help of his wife Sandy, rolled off the trailer early Thursday morning into 30-degree weather and air that measured far below sea level. The trick to Factory Stock is finding the balance between wheelstand and traction due to the 9-inch tire width. The car’s engine is built along the lines of OEM components and must be legal under strict Stock eliminator rules.

The Turk car features horsepower built by Engine Masters Challenge winner Tony Bischoff (BES Racing); this is a highly-blueprinted example of the factory Drag Pak 354 supercharged engine. The car also uses a worked Coan transmission and converter; the body was painted in stealth black when the package was built at Roush, and was subsequently dialed in by MR2 Performance and Mike Roth for class racing. The name comes from Geoff’s interest in aviation history.

By running in Super Stock, Geoff had dialed the car in during 2016 and it is now the quickest Drag Pak in history. Indeed, even in milder FS trim earlier this season, the car is so quick that it ran -1.30 under the index at a points race the weekend before the Gators. The result was that NHRA added 28 pounds to the 354 Drag Pak combination automatically. Since the LX-platform car still cannot get down to the new 3,518-lb. weight regardless, it will have no effect. In fact, the car actually runs a little heavier than the 3,550-lb. minimum in the Factory Stock Showdown.

The first shot Thursday yielded an 8.264, placing him into the field which ranged from 8.15 to 8.39. Those numbers had tightened up after the second round of qualifying, so though the Dodge had run a solid 8.204, it remained sixth in the program, which now ranged from 8.10 to 8.23. As a result, Geoff decided to make the class eliminations round that afternoon, but conditions had changed and the Blackbird spun the tires right at the launch. This would set up a first-round meeting on Saturday afternoon with Chris Holbrook’s Mustang, which was the number-two qualifier. Unfortunately, it had the same result; a light wheelstand that almost immediately unloaded the tires to end the Blackbird and 354 Drag Pak’s efforts in the first SAM Factory Stock Showdown.

Meanwhile, action continued in many other classes, and the following pictorial will give you the Sportsman lowdown from Gator-town, Mopar style!

Geoff Turk brought out the only Drag Pak for the season-opening SAM Factory Stock Showdown. This photo was taken during the excellent qualifying sessions on Thursday, with the resultant 8.20 putting the car into the program.Geoff Turk brought out the only Drag Pak for the season-opening SAM Factory Stock Showdown. This photo was taken during the excellent qualifying sessions on Thursday, with the resultant 8.20 putting the car into the program.
Geoff Turk brought out the only Drag Pak for the season-opening SAM Factory Stock Showdown. This photo was taken during the excellent qualifying sessions on Thursday, with the resultant 8.20 putting the car into the program.
mopar-muscle-2017-nhra-gatornationals-354-drag-pak-blackbird-graphicmopar-muscle-2017-nhra-gatornationals-354-drag-pak-blackbird-graphic
Turk’s great-looking car makes use of the legendary hypersonic ramjet spy plane of the United States military for graphics. Living up to its namesake, the Blackbird is the quickest and fastest Drag Pak presently in existence.
The car uses a “spec” 354 Drag Pak engine that has been approved for the class and blueprinted by BES Racing. Keeping the “stock” in Factory Stock is a big part of NHRA’s challenge for 2017. The Chrysler engineers are already working on the next generation of the engine. The car uses a “spec” 354 Drag Pak engine that has been approved for the class and blueprinted by BES Racing. Keeping the “stock” in Factory Stock is a big part of NHRA’s challenge for 2017. The Chrysler engineers are already working on the next generation of the engine.
The car uses a “spec” 354 Drag Pak engine that has been approved for the class and blueprinted by BES Racing. Keeping the “stock” in Factory Stock is a big part of NHRA’s challenge for 2017. The Chrysler engineers are already working on the next generation of the engine.
This year’s big Super Stock wheelstand winner was a tough call, but it had to go to Brad Plourd of Holly Pond, Alabama, who consistently put the nose of this FGT/L ’74 Duster way in the air and maxed out the wheelie bar travel. He went four rounds, and several additional photos are in the gallery.This year’s big Super Stock wheelstand winner was a tough call, but it had to go to Brad Plourd of Holly Pond, Alabama, who consistently put the nose of this FGT/L ’74 Duster way in the air and maxed out the wheelie bar travel. He went four rounds, and several additional photos are in the gallery.
This year’s big Super Stock wheelstand winner was a tough call, but it had to go to Brad Plourd of Holly Pond, Alabama, who consistently put the nose of this FGT/L ’74 Duster way in the air and maxed out the wheelie bar travel. He went four rounds, and several additional photos are in the gallery.
For the late models, there were a number of cars in Stock that also got air. The prize for 2017 goes to Stephen Smyth of Uxbridge, MA. Running in his family’s Port-A-Tree ’09 Dodge, Smyth kept the fans on their feet during qualifying and class with runs like this, though the car finally got up too high and cost him a round-one victory.For the late models, there were a number of cars in Stock that also got air. The prize for 2017 goes to Stephen Smyth of Uxbridge, MA. Running in his family’s Port-A-Tree ’09 Dodge, Smyth kept the fans on their feet during qualifying and class with runs like this, though the car finally got up too high and cost him a round-one victory.
For the late models, there were a number of cars in Stock that also got air. The prize for 2017 goes to Stephen Smyth of Uxbridge, MA. Running in his family’s Port-A-Tree ’09 Dodge, Smyth kept the fans on their feet during qualifying and class with runs like this, though the car finally got up too high and cost him a round-one victory.
One of the cars going furthest in eliminations of any Chrysler vehicle was long-time Mopar competitor Wes Leopold Jr. The former Max Wedge racer from the Pittsburgh area is now competing in Competition Eliminator with an A/SMA ’05 Avenger. He went to the final round in the highly-technical division.One of the cars going furthest in eliminations of any Chrysler vehicle was long-time Mopar competitor Wes Leopold Jr. The former Max Wedge racer from the Pittsburgh area is now competing in Competition Eliminator with an A/SMA ’05 Avenger. He went to the final round in the highly-technical division.
One of the cars going furthest in eliminations of any Chrysler vehicle was long-time Mopar competitor Wes Leopold Jr. The former Max Wedge racer from the Pittsburgh area is now competing in Competition Eliminator with an A/SMA ’05 Avenger. He went to the final round in the highly-technical division.
Driving furthest into Super Stock was the GT/LA 2000 Sebring of Michael Volkman, who used consistency to advance to the final round. Like Leopold, the pressure was on and a foul start was the result.        Driving furthest into Super Stock was the GT/LA 2000 Sebring of Michael Volkman, who used consistency to advance to the final round. Like Leopold, the pressure was on and a foul start was the result.
Driving furthest into Super Stock was the GT/LA 2000 Sebring of Michael Volkman, who used consistency to advance to the final round. Like Leopold, the pressure was on and a foul start was the result.
Leah Pritchett agreed to drive an SRT-built Challenger Drag Pak experimental between her runs in the Papa John’s Pizza fuel dragster. With some tuning work, the car eventually ran a 9.30 best, with Papa John Schnatter’s Camaro in the other lane.Leah Pritchett agreed to drive an SRT-built Challenger Drag Pak experimental between her runs in the Papa John’s Pizza fuel dragster. With some tuning work, the car eventually ran a 9.30 best, with Papa John Schnatter’s Camaro in the other lane.
Leah Pritchett agreed to drive an SRT-built Challenger Drag Pak experimental between her runs in the Papa John’s Pizza fuel dragster. With some tuning work, the car eventually ran a 9.30 best, with Papa John Schnatter’s Camaro in the other lane.
Pritchett took the effort seriously, seen here talking with SRT engineer Mike Rossey as they dialed the car during the weekend. Though she did not win Top Fuel, she is still the points leader leaving this event.Pritchett took the effort seriously, seen here talking with SRT engineer Mike Rossey as they dialed the car during the weekend. Though she did not win Top Fuel, she is still the points leader leaving this event.
Pritchett took the effort seriously, seen here talking with SRT engineer Mike Rossey as they dialed the car during the weekend. Though she did not win Top Fuel, she is still the points leader leaving this event.
Dennis Breeden was top qualifier in Super Stock with his 2010 Challenger. The Plainville, Indiana native went 9.43 on the 10.55 index, good enough for the sixth spot. Dennis Breeden was top qualifier in Super Stock with his 2010 Challenger. The Plainville, Indiana native went 9.43 on the 10.55 index, good enough for the sixth spot.
Dennis Breeden was top qualifier in Super Stock with his 2010 Challenger. The Plainville, Indiana native went 9.43 on the 10.55 index, good enough for the sixth spot.
In Stock, it was the 1963 383 Dodge of Thomas Auger of Florida. This car will be familiar to some enthusiasts, as former Top Fuel driver Jim Bailey raced it during the past several seasons with Max Wedge power.In Stock, it was the 1963 383 Dodge of Thomas Auger of Florida. This car will be familiar to some enthusiasts, as former Top Fuel driver Jim Bailey raced it during the past several seasons with Max Wedge power.
In Stock, it was the 1963 383 Dodge of Thomas Auger of Florida. This car will be familiar to some enthusiasts, as former Top Fuel driver Jim Bailey raced it during the past several seasons with Max Wedge power.
2016 US Nationals Hemi Challenge winner Jimmy Daniels was part of the strong SS/AH Hemi car field, with five entries on hand this year. He ran an 8.22 best.2016 US Nationals Hemi Challenge winner Jimmy Daniels was part of the strong SS/AH Hemi car field, with five entries on hand this year. He ran an 8.22 best.
2016 US Nationals Hemi Challenge winner Jimmy Daniels was part of the strong SS/AH Hemi car field, with five entries on hand this year. He ran an 8.22 best.
Notwithstanding, Dan Zrust’s Barracuda went furthest in eliminations out of all the ’68 Hemi machines, making it to round three and losing on a “heart-breakout,” 8.979 on an 8.98 dial in.Notwithstanding, Dan Zrust’s Barracuda went furthest in eliminations out of all the ’68 Hemi machines, making it to round three and losing on a “heart-breakout,” 8.979 on an 8.98 dial in.
Notwithstanding, Dan Zrust’s Barracuda went furthest in eliminations out of all the ’68 Hemi machines, making it to round three and losing on a “heart-breakout,” 8.979 on an 8.98 dial in.
Coolest OEM-look muscle car honors should be assigned to Jerry Hatch from Lubec, Maine.  A ’70 Challenger classed into SS/EA, this EV2-paint with Six Pack power put up both big numbers and big wheels-up launches. He eventually went to the semi-finals of Super Stock. Coolest OEM-look muscle car honors should be assigned to Jerry Hatch from Lubec, Maine.  A ’70 Challenger classed into SS/EA, this EV2-paint with Six Pack power put up both big numbers and big wheels-up launches. He eventually went to the semi-finals of Super Stock.
Coolest OEM-look muscle car honors should be assigned to Jerry Hatch from Lubec, Maine. A ’70 Challenger classed into SS/EA, this EV2-paint with Six Pack power put up both big numbers and big wheels-up launches. He eventually went to the semi-finals of Super Stock.
Big Dave Collette qualified seventh with his 2011 Challenger, classed in FSS/F. The Perryville, Maryland-based car features colorful paint and was another popular car for the Mopar fans to cheer for. Alas, he went home after round one.Big Dave Collette qualified seventh with his 2011 Challenger, classed in FSS/F. The Perryville, Maryland-based car features colorful paint and was another popular car for the Mopar fans to cheer for. Alas, he went home after round one.
Big Dave Collette qualified seventh with his 2011 Challenger, classed in FSS/F. The Perryville, Maryland-based car features colorful paint and was another popular car for the Mopar fans to cheer for. Alas, he went home after round one.
Ohio resident Bob Marshall’s 1965 “Dodge Material” Hemi Coronets have been part of Gatornationals since the 1970s. He keeps this car a little lower to the ground these days but it is still a popular machine. It was also the only B-Body Hemi car at this year’s event.Ohio resident Bob Marshall’s 1965 “Dodge Material” Hemi Coronets have been part of Gatornationals since the 1970s. He keeps this car a little lower to the ground these days but it is still a popular machine. It was also the only B-Body Hemi car at this year’s event.
Ohio resident Bob Marshall’s 1965 “Dodge Material” Hemi Coronets have been part of Gatornationals since the 1970s. He keeps this car a little lower to the ground these days but it is still a popular machine. It was also the only B-Body Hemi car at this year’s event.

MOPAR SUPER STOCK QUALIFIERS

Pos.: No.: Class: Name: Hometown: Car: ET/Index/Under:
6 381B FSS/K Dennis Breeden Plainville, IN ’10 Challenger 9.431/10.55/-1.119
7 1540 FSS/F David Collette Perryville, MD ’11 Challenger 9.107/10.20/-1.093
9 1058 SS/AH James Daniels Yardley, PA ’68 Dart 8.229/9.30/-1.071
10 428 FSS/E Kevin Helms Schriever, LA ’10 Challenger 8.979/10.05/-1.071
20 138 SS/AH Wendell Howes Rothesay, NB ’68 Barracuda 8.308/9.30/-0.992
21 J191 FSS/D Jonathan Allegrucci Scott Township, PA ’10 Challenger 8.912/9.90/-0.988
22 1519 SS/EA Jerry Hatch Lubec, ME ’70 Challenger 9.384/10.35/-0.966
27 1227 GT/LA Michael Volkman Campobello, SC ’00 Sebring 10.117/11.05/-0.933
28 2910 SS/KA Ed Longhany Sr. Wade, NC ’74 Duster 10.324/11.25/-0.926
41 1968 SS/AH Steve Comella Webster, NY ’68 Dart 8.479/9.30/-0.821
44 1960 SS/AH Al Smyth Uxbridge, MA ’68 Barracuda 8.531/9.30/-0.769
52 1981 SS/BM Richard Kay E. Meadow, NY ’69 Valiant 8.611/9.20/-0.589
58 6104 FGT/L Brad Plourd Holly Pond, AL ’09 Duster 10.448/10.85/-0.402
60 5583 SS/AH Dan Zrust Maple Grove, MN ’68 Barracuda 8.987/9.30/-0.313
62 3474 SS/BA Bob Marshall Columbus, OH ’65 Coronet 9.628/9.90/-0.272

MOPAR STOCK QUALIFIERS

8 1507 I/SA Thomas Auger Marco Island, FL ’63 Dodge 11.047/12.30/-1.253
18 456 FS/G Gary Robillard Walker, LA ’09 Challenger 10.223/11.35/-1.127
22 15 FS/D Stephen Smyth Uxbridge, MA ’09 Dodge 9.493/10.60/-1.107
31 383 A/SA Larry Hill Hickory, KY ’70 Barracuda 9.969/11.00/-1.031
33 428 C/SA Kevin Helms Schriever, LA ’13 Challenger 10.372/11.40/-1.028
39 29 FS/D Jim Bailey Bradenton, FL ’10 Dodge 9.593/10.60/-1.007
41 350 C/SA Douglas Duell Newburgh, IN ’69 Barracuda 10.413/11.40/-0.987
42 4022 E/SA Jeff Teuton Houma, LA ’10 Challenger 10.714/11.70/-0.986
51 3022 K/SA Jennifer McCormack Leonard, MI ’03 Dakota 11.732/12.65/-0.918
57 1135 D/SA Nick Reiter Warminster, PA ’71 Charger 10.723/11.55/-0.827
66 3473 E/SA Craig Marshall Columbus, OH ’74 Dart 11.007/11.70/-0.693
67 3474 F/SA Bob Marshall Columbus, OH ’73 Dart 11.164/11.85/-0.686

The post Mopars Hit Hard At The Gatornats! Huge Super Stock Gallery! appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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GALLERY: Majeski Repeats Rattler Victory – Hot Rod Network

The final portion of the Rattler 250 at South Alabama Speedway came down to two of the brightest young stars in Super Late Model racing this past Sunday. Ty Majeski capitalized on a restart with 19 laps remaining and surged away from Harrison Burton for his second straight win in the heralded event.

The young stars are forging quite a rivalry as they spent most of the 2017 World Series of Asphalt together at the front of the field. Burton took the crown at New Smyrna, Majeski visited the rattlesnake in Victory lane this time around.

The winning move by Majeski came on what proved to be the final restart. Burton spun his tires and Majeski pounced on the misfortune. As the eventual race winner built a lead, Burton was forced to try to hold off the advances of Steven Wallace. Burton survived the charge to retain Second, Wallace was Third, Jeff Choquette was Fourth, and Snowball Derby winner Christian Eckes finished Fifth.

 

From Matt Weaver YouTube:

For more information visit www.southalabamaspeedway.com

The post GALLERY: Majeski Repeats Rattler Victory appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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Rare Find: 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Sees Daylight After 40 Years’ Storage – Hot Rod Network

After 20 years trying to buy Donnie Detzel’s 1969 Z/28, Ralph Bizzarro finally heard the words he wanted to hear: “Are you ready to buy my Camaro?”

Donnie health wasn’t doing well healthwise. He figured he “might as well take the money and run. It’s not going to do me any good dead.” Donnie also knew that Ralphie (as he called him) was “meticulous and would take really good care” of his car.

Nonetheless, Ralph was in shock when he got the news. He said, “It just came out of the clear blue and hit me like a ton of bricks. I took off work the next day and went over and bought the car.”

Although the engine was out of the Camaro, the 302 small-block had matching numbers. The Z/28 was apart, but included many OE parts. What made this deal so sweet for Ralph was that the car was all there and had not even been on the road since 1976. He also liked that the muscle Chevy had been right there in Erie, Pennsylvania, its whole life, purchased new at Dailey Chevrolet.

Donnie bought the Z/28 in 1970 under unusual circumstances while he was still in high school. “I was driving my Corvette [down a neighborhood street], and I saw the back end of a Camaro and noticed Z/28 emblems. I spiked on the brakes.”

Donnie thought the people in the house were having a party. He knocked on the door and asked if the Z/28 was for sale. He was taken aback to discover parents holding a wake for their son who had been killed in Vietnam. Donnie apologized for his intrusion and said he could come back later. The father, however, actually wanted the car sold. Donnie believes the fallen soldier’s mom was distraught over her son’s long wait to get his dream ride and then not having much of a chance to drive it. Apparently they would as soon sell the car as leave it sit there.

Donnie bought the low-mileage Z/28 for $1,200, which he remembers as a “homerun” even in those days. He dug up an old photo of the car from 1970, taken not long after he bought it, sitting in his driveway in Erie.

“It was a plain Jane Camaro. No bumper guards, no wheelwell moldings, no nothing. A plain stock, fast-as-hell [Z/28], not even with Rally wheels, just hubcaps.”

Why did Donnie park such a fun ride in 1976? For the answer, the 61-year old drifted back to his high school days. He graduated in 1973 and went to work as a welder for GE. He recalled an Officer Wilcox.

“Back in the 1970s you weren’t allowed to do nothing to your car. You couldn’t change the exhausts. You couldn’t do nothing. Well, back then Hooker made these really neat headers that dumped out the side of the front wheels and went into a big 4-inch pipe. But that cop used to pull me over every day and hit me with a $150 fine. And I had to get to work.”

Frustrated, Donnie threw the headers and pipes in a “big, deep hole” he dug in his mom’s backyard, pulled the engine, and parked the Z/28 in his garage. The inspection sticker reveals 1976 was when he last registered the car.

Donnie says later the cops in the area “dropped all that,” referring to tickets for certain modifications, including side pipes, some underhood upgrades, and wider wheels that “stuck out,” Donnie recalls. But he still let the car sit. He did continue to stock up on OE parts for both his Z/28 and his 1966 “four-and-a-quarter horse” Corvette.

“Half the money I would make I’d go to Dailey Chevrolet and say, ‘Give me everything you have in stock for a ’69 Z/28.’ Then the next week I’d say, ‘Give me everything you have in stock for a ’66 Corvette.’ I bought all these pieces brand new because I knew these cars would be collector’s items. So Ralphie is going to have a really nice car when he is done.”

Ralph is having fun with his new toy, which he plans to put back exactly as delivered brand new.

Donnie Detzel photographed the 1969 Camaro Z/28 in his driveway not long after buying it in 1970. Donnie Detzel photographed the 1969 Camaro Z/28 in his driveway not long after buying it in 1970.
Donnie Detzel photographed the 1969 Camaro Z/28 in his driveway not long after buying it in 1970.
Another vintage photo dates to May 1976, after Donnie parked the Z/28, pulled the motor, and put the car on jackstands. Another vintage photo dates to May 1976, after Donnie parked the Z/28, pulled the motor, and put the car on jackstands.
Another vintage photo dates to May 1976, after Donnie parked the Z/28, pulled the motor, and put the car on jackstands.
The last six digits in the Camaro’s VIN are 530506.The last six digits in the Camaro’s VIN are 530506.
The last six digits in the Camaro’s VIN are 530506.
After buying his friend’s Camaro, Ralph Bizzarro highlighted the stampings on the block with white chalk to help show the digits (530506) that match the last six digits of the VIN. After buying his friend’s Camaro, Ralph Bizzarro highlighted the stampings on the block with white chalk to help show the digits (530506) that match the last six digits of the VIN.
After buying his friend’s Camaro, Ralph Bizzarro highlighted the stampings on the block with white chalk to help show the digits (530506) that match the last six digits of the VIN.
Ralph took this photo of the stamping located on a pad on the passenger side of the block near the cylinder head. The V1022DZ decodes as follows. V is the engine plant (Flint, Michigan); 10 is the tenth month (October) of 1968; 22 is the 22nd day of said month; DZ is the engine code suffix for the 302 unique to the Z/28.Ralph took this photo of the stamping located on a pad on the passenger side of the block near the cylinder head. The V1022DZ decodes as follows. V is the engine plant (Flint, Michigan); 10 is the tenth month (October) of 1968; 22 is the 22nd day of said month; DZ is the engine code suffix for the 302 unique to the Z/28.
Ralph took this photo of the stamping located on a pad on the passenger side of the block near the cylinder head. The V1022DZ decodes as follows. V is the engine plant (Flint, Michigan); 10 is the tenth month (October) of 1968; 22 is the 22nd day of said month; DZ is the engine code suffix for the 302 unique to the Z/28.
Information on the trim tag can be used to document the factory equipment on Camaros. Starting from top left: ST is the body style code; 12437 means this is a Camaro coupe. NOR stands for the Norwood assembly plant. The digits 140567 are Fisher body numbers with no relation to the VIN. TR means trim; 711 means black the standard bucket seat interior. The two 71s designate Le Mans blue paint for the upper and lower body. The date code is next to the left-side rivet on the tag; 10D on this tag means the car was made in the fourth week (D) of the 10th month (October). The X codes commonly found on Camaros to designate different models weren’t added to Fisher Body tags until mid December 1968; because this car was built before then, the tag will not contain the X77 (base Special Performance Package) or X33 (with the Style Trim Group) codes that usually accompany a Z/28.Information on the trim tag can be used to document the factory equipment on Camaros. Starting from top left: ST is the body style code; 12437 means this is a Camaro coupe. NOR stands for the Norwood assembly plant. The digits 140567 are Fisher body numbers with no relation to the VIN. TR means trim; 711 means black the standard bucket seat interior. The two 71s designate Le Mans blue paint for the upper and lower body. The date code is next to the left-side rivet on the tag; 10D on this tag means the car was made in the fourth week (D) of the 10th month (October). The X codes commonly found on Camaros to designate different models weren’t added to Fisher Body tags until mid December 1968; because this car was built before then, the tag will not contain the X77 (base Special Performance Package) or X33 (with the Style Trim Group) codes that usually accompany a Z/28.
Information on the trim tag can be used to document the factory equipment on Camaros. Starting from top left: ST is the body style code; 12437 means this is a Camaro coupe. NOR stands for the Norwood assembly plant. The digits 140567 are Fisher body numbers with no relation to the VIN. TR means trim; 711 means black the standard bucket seat interior. The two 71s designate Le Mans blue paint for the upper and lower body. The date code is next to the left-side rivet on the tag; 10D on this tag means the car was made in the fourth week (D) of the 10th month (October). The X codes commonly found on Camaros to designate different models weren’t added to Fisher Body tags until mid December 1968; because this car was built before then, the tag will not contain the X77 (base Special Performance Package) or X33 (with the Style Trim Group) codes that usually accompany a Z/28.
Ralph also snapped this photo of the numbers on the transmission, which reveal “530506,” another match to the last six digits of the VIN. Ralph also snapped this photo of the numbers on the transmission, which reveal “530506,” another match to the last six digits of the VIN.
Ralph also snapped this photo of the numbers on the transmission, which reveal “530506,” another match to the last six digits of the VIN.
Ralph was the happy recipient of Donnie Detzel’s trips to the local Dailey Chevrolet parts department many years ago to stock up on GM parts for his Camaro. Donnie told us he always knew his 425-horse Corvette and his Z/28 Camaro would be collector cars and that after a certain number of years GM would no longer be obligated to stock replacement parts. Ralph was the happy recipient of Donnie Detzel’s trips to the local Dailey Chevrolet parts department many years ago to stock up on GM parts for his Camaro. Donnie told us he always knew his 425-horse Corvette and his Z/28 Camaro would be collector cars and that after a certain number of years GM would no longer be obligated to stock replacement parts.
Ralph was the happy recipient of Donnie Detzel’s trips to the local Dailey Chevrolet parts department many years ago to stock up on GM parts for his Camaro. Donnie told us he always knew his 425-horse Corvette and his Z/28 Camaro would be collector cars and that after a certain number of years GM would no longer be obligated to stock replacement parts.
The trunk was stuffed full of parts, including heads and an intake manifold.The trunk was stuffed full of parts, including heads and an intake manifold.
The trunk was stuffed full of parts, including heads and an intake manifold.
It was a very happy day for Ralph when he brought the Z/28 on a flatbed to his home garage. It was a very happy day for Ralph when he brought the Z/28 on a flatbed to his home garage.
It was a very happy day for Ralph when he brought the Z/28 on a flatbed to his home garage.
The Camaro’s last registration expired on January 31, 1976.The Camaro’s last registration expired on January 31, 1976.
The Camaro’s last registration expired on January 31, 1976.
The interior, featuring black vinyl seats, is in excellent original condition, having been garaged since at least 1976. The interior, featuring black vinyl seats, is in excellent original condition, having been garaged since at least 1976.
The interior, featuring black vinyl seats, is in excellent original condition, having been garaged since at least 1976.
Donnie pulled and saved the original 302 engine.Donnie pulled and saved the original 302 engine.
Donnie pulled and saved the original 302 engine.

The post Rare Find: 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Sees Daylight After 40 Years’ Storage appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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GALLERY: Solomito Scores Whelen Mod Win at Myrtle Beach – Hot Rod Network

Keeping in line with our theme of March Monday Modified Madness comes a spectacular John A. Miller gallery from this weekend’s NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour’s Performance Plus 150 at Myrtle Beach Speedway.

It was another banner season-opening event for Timmy Solomito. Last season Solomito won the series’ lid lifter at Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park in Connecticut to grab his first ever series win. This season he had the opportunity to be the first to celebrate once again, albeit a few states south of his home in Islip, New York.

Solomito capitalized on a late-race caution to outduel Rob Summers in a green/white/checkered finish. It was his fifth series win. Summers, who sat on pole for the race, finished Second. Andy Seuess was Third, Ryan Preece was Fourth, and Max Zachem rounded out the Top Five.

“My team did a great job,” said Solomito. “We knew we had to ride and save our stuff as much as possible for the end of the race. I knew the last five laps we had to run as hard as possible and my team gave me a car good enough to do that.”

The event was historic as it ushered in the era of a unified NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour, instead of a North/South split. The series will run the majority of its races in the Northeast with stops at Bristol and Charlotte (a non-points event) in the South.

For more information visit hometracks.nascar.com

The post GALLERY: Solomito Scores Whelen Mod Win at Myrtle Beach appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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March Monday (Asphalt) Modified Madness! – Hot Rod Network

If you live in the Northeast or the South, you know just how much fun it is to watch Modifieds pound the pavement. If you’ve ever seen the ISMA Mods, well…we really don’t need to say any more.

Our March Modified Madness series of galleries continues with our favorite shots of the open-wheeled warriors on the asphalt from 2016 and 2017. Some of these shots come from The North/South Shootout, ISMA’s visit to Lee, and both Tour-type and Florida Mods during Speedweeks.

Next Monday we’ll round out March Mod Madness with a look at some of our favorite Vintage Mods.

The post March Monday (Asphalt) Modified Madness! appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

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Giant Mopar Pile-Up Hits Anaheim: Nuttin’ But Hemis! – Hot Rod Network

It certainly isn’t unique that a make of car would have a core group of devotees. There are tons of clubs for Mustangs, Camaros, street rods, and so forth. What is unusual is that such a group could grow so large in such a short period of time. We’re talking about fans of Chrysler’s (now FCA) rear-drive platform cars. Originally internally designated the “LX,” the vehicle platform was the basis of all Chrysler 300 and Dodge Magnum sedans starting in 2005. In 2006 the LX spawned the Dodge Charger sedan, and in 2008 it produced the Dodge Challenger coupe. Over the LX’s 12-year history, the deck has been shuffled. The Magnum—America’s last station wagon—was killed off in 2008, and the platform has been revised to accommodate FCA’s new 8-speed Torqueflite transmission, now carrying the chassis designation “LA.”

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2017-spring-festival-lxs-hemi-challenger-charger-300c-magnum-hellcat-32

To the average citizen, all this alphabet soup means little, but to Mopar gearheads it’s nothing short of nirvana. To understand the exuberance over FCA’s LX-platform cars, one has to turn back the clock to 1989 as Chrysler wound down production of its M-Body platform, which was the basis for cars such as the Dodge Diplomat, Plymouth Gran Fury, and Chrysler Fifth Avenue. For sixteen long years, Chrysler was out of the mainstream rearwheel-drive market—and forget about V8 power too. While the rest of America loaded up on Mustangs, Camaros, Thunderbirds, Firebirds, Impala SSs, Corvettes—even Cadillacs—Chrysler aficionados got zilch. (Ok, the wealthy did get very limited quantities of the Plymouth Prowler and Dodge Viper.)

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2017-spring-festival-lxs-hemi-challenger-charger-300c-magnum-hellcat-69

Apparently, the unhappy situation was also felt by engineers and management at Chrysler. By the end of the 20th century, Chrysler was floating cool auto show concepts of Chrysler 300s and Dodge Chargers, and they made no bones about the fact these concepts were both V8-powered and rearwheel drive. Chrysler also un-muzzled the normally tight-lipped PR department, approving language that these show concepts had a high probability of seeing production in some form. When the new third generation of the Hemi V8 started showing up in Ram trucks in 2003, well, the match had been thrown on the tinderbox.

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2017-spring-festival-lxs-hemi-challenger-charger-300c-magnum-hellcat-68

So sets the stage for one John Fortuno and thousands of like-minded souls in California. While the fire was building inside Chrysler, it had also been building with a tech-savvy group of like-minded Mopar fans. Pent-up demand for V8-powered rear-drive Chrysler performance combined with the community-building effect of the internet produced a fan base called SoCalLX.com. Led by Fortuno, the website was one of the first to garner a large following of people who planned to buy the new “LX” platform cars once they hit the showroom. (For his part, Fortuno is officially a 300C man!) As the Magnum and 300C began production for the 2005 model year, the adoption rate—as well as conquest sales from other brands—was phenomenal.

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2017-spring-festival-lxs-hemi-challenger-charger-300c-magnum-hellcat-125

Not wasting any time—and with a relatively large number of members who were now owners—SoCalLX.com held their first car meet in 2005 at the parking lot of a local Dave & Busters. Other clubs in the region soon joined forces, and the yearly Spring Festival of LXs grew at an astronomical rate. Now in its twelfth year, the event takes place—with FCA’s financial help—in Anaheim, CA at the expansive Angels Stadium parking lot. For 2017, the preregistered car count swelled to 1,450 vehicles, an envious number that is even more shocking when you consider last-minute drive-ins and spectators are not allowed. Moreover, very little advance publicity is given to the event; there are no radio ads, no magazine ads, no tv, no event flyers—just digital and oral word-of-mouth PR from SoCalLX.com members and affiliated club websites. It’s a grassroots non-profit effort by regular folks who have a deep passion for Chrysler performance and the third-gen Hemi V8. Oh, and let’s not forget the little engine that could—the Pentastar V6!

More Action Here!
Wanna check out previous years’ coverage of the Spring Festival of LXs, including some giant photo galleries and highlight video reels? Click here!

2016 Spring Festival Of LXs:
Hemis Invade Angel Stadium

2015 Spring Festival Of LXs:
Highlights from the 10th Annual Spring Festival of LXS

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